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The Ottoman Empire by J. Hondius.

The Turkish Empire, covering Greece and the Balkans, Arabia and much of North Africa is depicted in this engraving. The portrait above the title is Mehmed II (1451-81), whose capture of Constantinople in 1453 brought to an end the Byzantine Empire. As the city controlled the entrance to the Black Sea it was a bitter loss to Christendom.
The fall of Constantinople also severed the main overland trade link between Europe and Asia, which had an unexpected result. The West now had to turn to ships to create new trade routes. Attempting to sail around this enemy in the Middle East, Portuguese navigator Batolomeu Dias rounded the Cape of Good Hope in 1488; and attempting to reach the Indies by going west Columbus found the New World in 1492.

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Turcici Imperii Imago., 1619.

€800  ($936 / £720)
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Item Number:  8451
Category:  Antique maps > Asia > Middle East

Old map of the Ottoman Empire by J. Hondius.

Date of the first edition: 1606
Date of this map: 1619

Copper engraving
Size: 36.5 x 49cm (14.2 x 19 inches)
Verso text: French
Condition: Contemporary old coloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A
References: Van der Krogt 1, 8100:1A; Baynton-Williams New Worlds, p.63.

From: Gerardi Mercatoris - Atlas sive Cosmographicae Meditationes de Fabrica Mundi et Fabricati Figura. Amsterdam, J. Hondius, 1619. (Van der Krogt 1, 113)

The Turkish Empire, covering Greece and the Balkans, Arabia and much of North Africa is depicted in this engraving. The portrait above the title is Mehmed II (1451-81), whose capture of Constantinople in 1453 brought to an end the Byzantine Empire. As the city controlled the entrance to the Black Sea it was a bitter loss to Christendom.
The fall of Constantinople also severed the main overland trade link between Europe and Asia, which had an unexpected result. The West now had to turn to ships to create new trade routes. Attempting to sail around this enemy in the Middle East, Portuguese navigator Batolomeu Dias rounded the Cape of Good Hope in 1488; and attempting to reach the Indies by going west Columbus found the New World in 1492.