This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product?

Istanbul (Constantinople), by Hartmann Schedel.

Hartmann Schedel (Nuremberg, 1440-1514) and the Nuremberg Chronicle.

Hartmann Schedel grew up in Nuremberg and first studied liberal art in Leipzig. He earned a doctorate in medicine in Padua in 1466, then settled in Nuremberg to practice medicine and collect books. According to an inventory done in 1498, Schedel's library contained 370 manuscripts and 670 printed books.
Schedel is best known for his writing the text for the Nuremberg Chronicle, an illustrated biblical paraphrase and world history that follows the story of human history related in the Bible; it includes the histories of many important Western cities. It was commissioned by Sebald Schreyer (1446–1520) and Sebastian Kammermeister (1446–1503) and published in 1493 in Nuremberg. Maps in the Chronicle were the first-ever illustrations of many cities and countries. Wolgemut and Pleydenwurff, the painters, were commissioned to provide the illustrations and to take care of the layout. The large workshop of Michael Wolgemut, then Nuremberg's leading artist in various media, provided the 1,809 woodcut illustrations (duplications included).
Albrecht Dürer was an apprentice with Wolgemut from 1486 to 1489, so he may well have participated in designing some of the illustrations.
The Liber Chronicarum was first published in Latin on 12 July 1493 in the city of Nuremberg, printed by Anton Koberger, the most successful publisher in Germany. A German translation followed on 23 December 1493. An estimated 1400 to 1500 Latin and 700 to 1000 German copies were published.
Due to the great success and prestige of the Chronicle, pirate editions soon appeared on the market. Johann Schönsperger (c. 1455-1521), a printer working out of Augsburg, published smaller editions of the Chronicle in 1496, 1497, and 1500 in German, and Latin.

back

Constantinopolis. - Hartmann Schedel.

€1000  ($1170 / £900)
add to cart
questions?

Item Number:  24379
Category:  Antique maps > Asia > Turkey - Cyprus

Old map - Double-page view of Istanbul (Constantinople) by H. Schedel.

Date of this print: 1493 (first edition)

Woodcut
Size: 24 x 52.5cm (9.4 x 20.5 inches)
Verso text: Latin
Condition: Excellent.
Condition Rating: A

From: Liber Chronicarum. (= Nuremberg Chronicle). Nuremberg, Koberger, 1493.

This major work, by the Nuremberg doctor Hartmann Schedel, generally known as the Nuremberg Chronicle was printed by Anton Koberger, the foremost printer of the day. It is a history of the world from the Creation to contemporary times. The work is remarkable for its illustrations, design and its woodcuts and description of cities. The views are some of the earliest representations of towns and cities, with around 116 places being identified by name. The numerous woodcut views, illustrations and maps are made by Michael Wohlgemuth and Wilhem Pleydenwurff and their workshop including Albrecht Dürer.

Hartmann Schedel (Nuremberg, 1440-1514) and the Nuremberg Chronicle.

Hartmann Schedel grew up in Nuremberg and first studied liberal art in Leipzig. He earned a doctorate in medicine in Padua in 1466, then settled in Nuremberg to practice medicine and collect books. According to an inventory done in 1498, Schedel's library contained 370 manuscripts and 670 printed books.
Schedel is best known for his writing the text for the Nuremberg Chronicle, an illustrated biblical paraphrase and world history that follows the story of human history related in the Bible; it includes the histories of many important Western cities. It was commissioned by Sebald Schreyer (1446–1520) and Sebastian Kammermeister (1446–1503) and published in 1493 in Nuremberg. Maps in the Chronicle were the first-ever illustrations of many cities and countries. Wolgemut and Pleydenwurff, the painters, were commissioned to provide the illustrations and to take care of the layout. The large workshop of Michael Wolgemut, then Nuremberg's leading artist in various media, provided the 1,809 woodcut illustrations (duplications included).
Albrecht Dürer was an apprentice with Wolgemut from 1486 to 1489, so he may well have participated in designing some of the illustrations.
The Liber Chronicarum was first published in Latin on 12 July 1493 in the city of Nuremberg, printed by Anton Koberger, the most successful publisher in Germany. A German translation followed on 23 December 1493. An estimated 1400 to 1500 Latin and 700 to 1000 German copies were published.
Due to the great success and prestige of the Chronicle, pirate editions soon appeared on the market. Johann Schönsperger (c. 1455-1521), a printer working out of Augsburg, published smaller editions of the Chronicle in 1496, 1497, and 1500 in German, and Latin.