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Ypres, by Sr. S. de Beaulieu. c. 1691

Sr. Sébastien de Beaulieu (1612 - 1674)

Sébastien de Pontault, Sieur de Beaulieu was born around 1612. He entered the service of the king at the age of 15. Despite his young age, he obtained the post of commissioner of artillery in 1628. He had a successful career in the military but was severely wounded several times. In 1642 he received a royal privilege for creating and publishing battle plans. At the request of the king, he had numerous sieges engraved.
de Beaulieu left us fourteen small oblong atlases of plans and profiles of the cities of France, commonly called “les Petits Beaulieu”, and a large folio atlas of the battles of Louis XIII and Louis XIV, known as “le Grand Beaulieu”. These works are the culmination of a long career as a military engineer.
Beaulieu died in 1674 before having completed his collection of battle plans. It was his niece, Reine-Michèle de Beaulieu, who completed the atlas in 1694.


Covens & Mortier. A Map Publishing House in Amsterdam. 1721-1866.

During almost two centuries, the largest and most important Dutch publishing house in the field of commercial cartography was the Amsterdam firm of Covens & Mortier. Concerning quantity, it was possibly even the biggest contemporary map-trading house worldwide. They distributed innumerable maps, atlases, globes, and books.

The house Covens & Mortier (1721-1866), was founded by Johannes Covens I (1697-1774) and Cornelis Mortier (1699-1783), at the Vijgendam in Amsterdam.

The collaboration started after the death of Pieter Mortier (1661-1711), son of a French political refugee, who in 1690 had obtained the privilege to distribute maps and atlases of French publishers in Holland. His widow continued the business until she died in 1719. Her son Cornelis, under his father's name, took over the management for a few years.

On November 20, 1721, a company was founded by Cornelis Mortier and Johannes Covens I. The latter was married the same year with Cornelis's sister. From that year on, the name of:

Covens & Mortier.

Their firm would see a massive expansion in the next 140 years. In 1732 the heirs sold the property to their brother Cornelis and his partner Covens. Their main competitors were Reinier & Josua Ottens and Gerard Valck & Petrus Schenck. After the death of Johannes Covens I (1774), his son Johannes Covens II (1722-1794) entered the business. From 1778 a new company name was added:

J. Covens & Son.

Johannes Covens II was succeeded by his son Cornelis Covens (1764-1825), who, in turn, brought Peter Mortier IV, the great-grandson of Petrus Mortier I, into the business. The name was from 1794 to 1866:

Mortier, Covens & Son.

The last Covens in the series was Cornelis Johannes Covens (1806-1880).

Covens & Mortier had a large stock of atlases and maps, including those of: Delisle, Jaillot, Johannes Janssonius, Sanson, Claes Jansz. Visscher, Nicolaas Visscher, and Frederik de Wit. For decades, an impressive number of atlases came from the press.

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Plan de la ville d'Ipres.

€320  ($380.8 / £284.8)
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Item Number:  27704  new
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Belgium - Cities
References: Van der Krogt 4 - #1871; Verbouwe (Ieper) - #198 c

Old, antique plan of Ypres, by S. de Beaulieu.

Oude, antiek plan van Ieper, door S. de Beaulieu.

Cartographer: Sr. S. de Beaulieu

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 40 x 49cm (15.6 x 19.1 inches)
Verso: Blank
Condition: Original coloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A+
References: Van der Krogt 4, #1871; Verbouwe (Ieper) , #198 c.

From: Plans des principales cités de l'Univers. Amsterdam, Dancker Danckerts / Pierre Mortier, c. 1691. (Van der Krogt 4, 49D)

Sr. Sébastien de Beaulieu (1612 - 1674)

Sébastien de Pontault, Sieur de Beaulieu was born around 1612. He entered the service of the king at the age of 15. Despite his young age, he obtained the post of commissioner of artillery in 1628. He had a successful career in the military but was severely wounded several times. In 1642 he received a royal privilege for creating and publishing battle plans. At the request of the king, he had numerous sieges engraved.
de Beaulieu left us fourteen small oblong atlases of plans and profiles of the cities of France, commonly called “les Petits Beaulieu”, and a large folio atlas of the battles of Louis XIII and Louis XIV, known as “le Grand Beaulieu”. These works are the culmination of a long career as a military engineer.
Beaulieu died in 1674 before having completed his collection of battle plans. It was his niece, Reine-Michèle de Beaulieu, who completed the atlas in 1694.


Covens & Mortier. A Map Publishing House in Amsterdam. 1721-1866.

During almost two centuries, the largest and most important Dutch publishing house in the field of commercial cartography was the Amsterdam firm of Covens & Mortier. Concerning quantity, it was possibly even the biggest contemporary map-trading house worldwide. They distributed innumerable maps, atlases, globes, and books.

The house Covens & Mortier (1721-1866), was founded by Johannes Covens I (1697-1774) and Cornelis Mortier (1699-1783), at the Vijgendam in Amsterdam.

The collaboration started after the death of Pieter Mortier (1661-1711), son of a French political refugee, who in 1690 had obtained the privilege to distribute maps and atlases of French publishers in Holland. His widow continued the business until she died in 1719. Her son Cornelis, under his father's name, took over the management for a few years.

On November 20, 1721, a company was founded by Cornelis Mortier and Johannes Covens I. The latter was married the same year with Cornelis's sister. From that year on, the name of:

Covens & Mortier.

Their firm would see a massive expansion in the next 140 years. In 1732 the heirs sold the property to their brother Cornelis and his partner Covens. Their main competitors were Reinier & Josua Ottens and Gerard Valck & Petrus Schenck. After the death of Johannes Covens I (1774), his son Johannes Covens II (1722-1794) entered the business. From 1778 a new company name was added:

J. Covens & Son.

Johannes Covens II was succeeded by his son Cornelis Covens (1764-1825), who, in turn, brought Peter Mortier IV, the great-grandson of Petrus Mortier I, into the business. The name was from 1794 to 1866:

Mortier, Covens & Son.

The last Covens in the series was Cornelis Johannes Covens (1806-1880).

Covens & Mortier had a large stock of atlases and maps, including those of: Delisle, Jaillot, Johannes Janssonius, Sanson, Claes Jansz. Visscher, Nicolaas Visscher, and Frederik de Wit. For decades, an impressive number of atlases came from the press.