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*** Extremely rare Rhine River map by Cornelis Claesz. , published by Nicolaas van Geelkercken. ***

The map coverage is bounded to the southeast by the line Groningen - Frankfurt. In the southwest, the boundary is formed by the line Antwerp - Namur - Luxembourg. A characteristic feature of the map image is the accentuated depiction of the flow structure of the Rhine River and its confluences. This is not surprising, because the model used by the engraver Benjamin Wright was one of the monumental maps of the Rhine that had appeared at the end of the sixteenth century: the map by Theodor de Bry, published in 1594 in three sheets.
De Bry's map is based on a much older map, one that had come to dominate the cartographic depiction of the Rhine for a very long period. Caspar Vopelius, a mapmaker from Cologne, produced in 1555 a map of the Rhine in five sheets. One copy of this map has been preserved. In composing this map, Vopelius has created a masterpiece, the first to provide a uniform and detailed image of the entire course of the Rhine. The main accent is on the representation of the river systems; the forests and mountains ate schematically drawn.
Cornelis Claesz was responding to the demand for a general map of the Rhine and Maas area. In those years, this area was repeatedly a theater of war in the conflict between Prince Maurits and the Spanish commander Spinola. De Bry's map of the Rhine formed an ideal model for the publication of a separate map of this area. The map engraved by Benjamin Wright did not cover the entire course of the Rhine, however, extending only to Mainz. Nonetheless, De Bry's map was copied in every detail for the map image from the North Sea to Frankfurt and Mainz. The use of the idealized miniature profiles in various sizes of circles as symbols for less important places offers a good overview of the significance of each of the diverse settlements. The strategic importance of bridges is given the necessary attention on the map.

This third state of Cornelis Claesz's map of the Rhine in one-and-a-half sheets was reissued by Nicolaas van Geelkercken (1585/86-1656). Van Geelkercken already had a long service record. From 1603 on, he lived in Amsterdam, where he was educated as an engraver and surveyor. His earliest maps and prints date from 1610. At the end of 1615 he moved to Leiden, where he lived till 1628.

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Tabula geographica Prouinciarum Brabantiae, Geldriae comitatus Sutphaniae, Traiectini, Transiluaniae; Drentiae, Twentiae, Hollandiae, et Frisiae: ..., After 1630.

€5900  ($6962 / £5428)
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Item Number:  27065
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > The Netherlands
References: Schilder 7 - p.440-445 15.13 third state.

# Extremely rare Rhine River map by Cornelis Claesz.

Old, antique map of the Rhine River, by Cornelis Claesz, published by Nicolaas van Geelkercken.

Oriented to the west-south-west.

Third state (of three).

Mapmaker: Cornelis Claesz.
Engraver: Benjamin Wright
Editor: Nicolaas van Geelkercken

Date of this map: After 1630
Date of the first state: c. 1600

Copper engraving, printed on paper from two plates, joined.
Size (not including margins): 32 x 67cm (12.5 x 26.1 inches)
Verso: Blank
Condition: Remargined, two chips in lower border (2.5 x 5cm), restored with blank paper.
Condition Rating: C+
References: Schilder 7, p.440-445 15.13 third state.

Separate publication.

One copy recorded of the first state, four of the second state and three of the third state. (Schilder).

The map coverage is bounded to the southeast by the line Groningen - Frankfurt. In the southwest, the boundary is formed by the line Antwerp - Namur - Luxembourg. A characteristic feature of the map image is the accentuated depiction of the flow structure of the Rhine River and its confluences. This is not surprising, because the model used by the engraver Benjamin Wright was one of the monumental maps of the Rhine that had appeared at the end of the sixteenth century: the map by Theodor de Bry, published in 1594 in three sheets.
De Bry's map is based on a much older map, one that had come to dominate the cartographic depiction of the Rhine for a very long period. Caspar Vopelius, a mapmaker from Cologne, produced in 1555 a map of the Rhine in five sheets. One copy of this map has been preserved. In composing this map, Vopelius has created a masterpiece, the first to provide a uniform and detailed image of the entire course of the Rhine. The main accent is on the representation of the river systems; the forests and mountains ate schematically drawn.
Cornelis Claesz was responding to the demand for a general map of the Rhine and Maas area. In those years, this area was repeatedly a theater of war in the conflict between Prince Maurits and the Spanish commander Spinola. De Bry's map of the Rhine formed an ideal model for the publication of a separate map of this area. The map engraved by Benjamin Wright did not cover the entire course of the Rhine, however, extending only to Mainz. Nonetheless, De Bry's map was copied in every detail for the map image from the North Sea to Frankfurt and Mainz. The use of the idealized miniature profiles in various sizes of circles as symbols for less important places offers a good overview of the significance of each of the diverse settlements. The strategic importance of bridges is given the necessary attention on the map.

This third state of Cornelis Claesz's map of the Rhine in one-and-a-half sheets was reissued by Nicolaas van Geelkercken (1585/86-1656). Van Geelkercken already had a long service record. From 1603 on, he lived in Amsterdam, where he was educated as an engraver and surveyor. His earliest maps and prints date from 1610. At the end of 1615 he moved to Leiden, where he lived till 1628.