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Northern Atlantic Ocean by Girolamo Ruscelli. 1574

Girolamo Ruscelli (1504 (1518?) -1566)

Girolamo Ruscelli was an Italian mathematician and cartographer active in Venice during the early 16th century. He was also an alchemist, writing pseudonymously as Alessio Piemontese.
He published a translation of the Geografia of Ptolemy, printed in Venice by Vincenzo Valgrisi in 1561. It was a quarto edition with Ptolemaic and modern maps. The engravers may have been the brothers Giulio and Livio Sanuto. Among the 69 copperplate maps were 40 based on maps by Giacomo Gastaldi. The maps were re-issued in 1562, 1564, 1574 and 1598.

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Septenirionalium Partium Nova Tabula.

€550  ($577.5 / £462)
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Item Number:  28298
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Northern Europe
References: Burden - #45

Old, antique map of Atlantic Ocean (North), by Girolamo Ruscelli.

Title: Septenirionalium Partium Nova Tabula.

Cartographer: Nicolo Zeno.

Second edition with the word 'Septenirionalium' in the title. (In the first edition 1561: Septentrionalium).

Date of the first edition: 1561.
Date of this map: 1574.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 190 x 245mm (7.48 x 9.65 inches).
Verso: Italian text.
Condition: Excellent.
Condition Rating: A+.
References: Burden, #45;

From: La Geografia di Claudio Tolomeo Alessandrino, Nuovamente tradotta di Greco in Italiano da Girolamo Ruscelli. Venice, Vincenzo Valgrisi, 1574. (Karrow, p. 222 30/C.1)

Girolamo Ruscelli (1504 (1518?) -1566)

Girolamo Ruscelli was an Italian mathematician and cartographer active in Venice during the early 16th century. He was also an alchemist, writing pseudonymously as Alessio Piemontese.
He published a translation of the Geografia of Ptolemy, printed in Venice by Vincenzo Valgrisi in 1561. It was a quarto edition with Ptolemaic and modern maps. The engravers may have been the brothers Giulio and Livio Sanuto. Among the 69 copperplate maps were 40 based on maps by Giacomo Gastaldi. The maps were re-issued in 1562, 1564, 1574 and 1598.