This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product? (#7049)

Authenticity Guarantee
All items are guaranteed authentic prints (woodcuts or engravings) or manuscripts made at or about (c.) the given date and in good condition unless stated otherwise. We don’t sell facsimiles or reproductions. We deliver every map with a Certificate of Authenticity containing all the details.

Wien, by D. Danckerts. c. 1660

The Danckerts Family.

The Danckerts family of Amsterdam was one of the best-known print and map sellers in 17th century Amsterdam. Their business activity covered a vast period, from ca. 1633. From 1669 until 1701, father Justus and his sons had their shop in the ‘Calverstraet in de Danckbaerheyt’.

Cornelis Danckerts (1561-1631) was a printseller born in Amsterdam and active in Antwerp.

Cornelis Danckerts, the elder (1603-1656) was an engraver and publisher in Amsterdam and Nieuwendijk. Son of Cornelis (above), whom he succeeded in 1631.

The house of Danckerts gained its greatest fame from Justus Danckerts (1635-1701 - son of Cornelis the elder) and his two sons, Theodorus and Cornelis. Dancker Danckerts (1634-1666), the elder brother of Justus, was known for his etchings of paintings, maps, and publications.

The grandfather, father, and sons were highly skilled and excellent artistic drafters and engravers. They are famous for the edition of their Atlas, which appeared from ca. 1686, and for several monumental and beautiful wall maps and views. However, compared with that published by the Blaeu's or Janssonius's, their cartographic work has attracted little attention and has never received proper recognition.

 On 14 August 1684, Justus and his sons obtained the privilege from the States of Holland for their publications. In 1713, twelve years after Justus Danckerts, the heirs decided to sell part of the stock of maps and atlases and many copperplates. In 1727, after the death of the last surviving brother Theodorus, a final sale took place.

back

Vienna Austria.

€1600  ($1712 / £1360)
add to cart
Buy now
questions?
PRINT

Item Number:  7049 Authenticity Guarantee

Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Austria


Antique bird's-eye view plan of Wien by D. Danckerts.

Title: Vienna Austria.

Date: c. 1660.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 405 x 510mm (15.94 x 20.08 inches).
Verso: Blank.
Condition: Excellent.
Condition Rating: A+.

From: Plans des principales cités de l'Univers. Amsterdam, Dankcer Danckerts, c. 1660.

The Danckerts Family.

The Danckerts family of Amsterdam was one of the best-known print and map sellers in 17th century Amsterdam. Their business activity covered a vast period, from ca. 1633. From 1669 until 1701, father Justus and his sons had their shop in the ‘Calverstraet in de Danckbaerheyt’.

Cornelis Danckerts (1561-1631) was a printseller born in Amsterdam and active in Antwerp.

Cornelis Danckerts, the elder (1603-1656) was an engraver and publisher in Amsterdam and Nieuwendijk. Son of Cornelis (above), whom he succeeded in 1631.

The house of Danckerts gained its greatest fame from Justus Danckerts (1635-1701 - son of Cornelis the elder) and his two sons, Theodorus and Cornelis. Dancker Danckerts (1634-1666), the elder brother of Justus, was known for his etchings of paintings, maps, and publications.

The grandfather, father, and sons were highly skilled and excellent artistic drafters and engravers. They are famous for the edition of their Atlas, which appeared from ca. 1686, and for several monumental and beautiful wall maps and views. However, compared with that published by the Blaeu's or Janssonius's, their cartographic work has attracted little attention and has never received proper recognition.

 On 14 August 1684, Justus and his sons obtained the privilege from the States of Holland for their publications. In 1713, twelve years after Justus Danckerts, the heirs decided to sell part of the stock of maps and atlases and many copperplates. In 1727, after the death of the last surviving brother Theodorus, a final sale took place.

References: Van der Krogt 4 - 4831