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Törökszentmiklos by Braun G. & Hogenberg F. c. 1625

CARTOUCHE: Sanctonicolaum, in the vernacular Törökszentmiklós, a town in Upper Hungary near Zolnochium, was set on fire and abandoned by the Turks on the arrival of Emperor Maximilian. 20 October 1595. Procured by Georg Hoefnagel.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "The soil of the surrounding farmland is very fertile for vines, grain and root crops. For this reason, the Turks would have liked to stay longer, as is clear from the splendid mosque, the baths and other fine houses they built here. Particularly as it was also a real robbers' den and well-situated for good booty. [...] After the Christians had captured Esztergom, Weissengrad and other castles and fortresses, the Turks became so stricken with fear that they abandoned not only this but also other fortresses and fled without good cause."

The Turkish fortress is shown from a birds-eye perspective looking towards the east. It lies to the east of Szolnok and is shown when many buildings are going up in flames or have already been destroyed. The cartouche text tells us that this event occurred on 20 October 1595, with the Turks having set their fortress on fire during their retreat when Emperor Rudolf II (erroneously called Maximilian in the cartouche) was approaching with his troops. A few buildings have been preserved, including the minaret of the partially destroyed mosque and, in front of it, the Turkish bath with its two domes. An Ottoman cemetery can be seen in the bottom right-hand corner. (Taschen)

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Sanctonicolaum vulgo S. Nicolas Oppidum in Superiore Hungaria prope Zolnochium quod ipsi met Turcae ...

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Item Number:  16453 Authenticity Guarantee

Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Central Europe

Antique map - Bird's-eye view of the fortified city of Törökszentmiklós by Braun and Hogenberg after G. Hoefnagel.

Date of the first edition: 1617
Date of this map: c. 1625

Copper engraving
Size: 33 x 45cm (12.9 x 17.6 inches)
Verso text: French
Condition: Contemporary coloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A
References: Van der Krogt 4, 4408; Taschen, Braun and Hogenberg, p.473.

From: Théatre des Principales Villes de tout l'Univers Vol. VI. c. 1625. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:3.6)

CARTOUCHE: Sanctonicolaum, in the vernacular Törökszentmiklós, a town in Upper Hungary near Zolnochium, was set on fire and abandoned by the Turks on the arrival of Emperor Maximilian. 20 October 1595. Procured by Georg Hoefnagel.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "The soil of the surrounding farmland is very fertile for vines, grain and root crops. For this reason, the Turks would have liked to stay longer, as is clear from the splendid mosque, the baths and other fine houses they built here. Particularly as it was also a real robbers' den and well-situated for good booty. [...] After the Christians had captured Esztergom, Weissengrad and other castles and fortresses, the Turks became so stricken with fear that they abandoned not only this but also other fortresses and fled without good cause."

The Turkish fortress is shown from a birds-eye perspective looking towards the east. It lies to the east of Szolnok and is shown when many buildings are going up in flames or have already been destroyed. The cartouche text tells us that this event occurred on 20 October 1595, with the Turks having set their fortress on fire during their retreat when Emperor Rudolf II (erroneously called Maximilian in the cartouche) was approaching with his troops. A few buildings have been preserved, including the minaret of the partially destroyed mosque and, in front of it, the Turkish bath with its two domes. An Ottoman cemetery can be seen in the bottom right-hand corner. (Taschen)

References: Van der Krogt 4 - 4408; Taschen (Br. Hog.) - p.473