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Frankfurt am Main by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg. 1577

TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Frankfurt is a unique city in East Franconia, or rather, at its extremity, lying on the Main, the most famous trade city in all of Germany, very well known amongst all the peoples of Europe; the Roman Emperor is elected here by the most illustrious College of Seven, the Electors, and the fencing masters designated. [...] In his treatise on Germany, Franciscus Irenicus attests that he has seen in a monastery a description of Frankfurt in seven books written by a deacon named Entrandus. Connected to Frankfurt by an elegant stone bridge is Sachsenhausen, a town of no ordinary magnificence. Frankfurt is surrounded by bulwarks, walls, ramparts and moats that are exceptionally well designed for defensive purposes.
 
COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The city's largest and most magnificent part is called Frankfurt, the other Sachsenhausen, which is also surrounded by walls and moats. Frankfurt is a leading centre of trade not just in Germany but in Europe. Twice a year, before Easter, in the middle of Lent, and autumn, large numbers of merchants come from Lower and Upper Germany and many other parts of the world to the annual fairs here. Emperor Charles IV also had a particular liking for this city, so he moved the election of the kings and emperors of the Romans to here and confirmed this in his Golden Bull."
 
An impressive bird's-eye view from the southwest of the powerful trade city of Frankfurt, in 1605, home to 20,000 people. St Batholomew's cathedral, the coronation church of the German kings and emperors, stands on the hill at the core of the original settlement on the right bank of the Main. On the Römerberg hill further left, the Römer and Goldener Schwan houses served as the town hall from 1405 onwards; to their right lies the Gothic councillors' church of St Nicholas. Identified in the Sachsenhausen quarter are the church of the Magi (H. Drei Konig), which became Frankfurt's first Protestant church in 1525, and the house of the Teutonic Knights (Teutsch Hauss). Frankfurt had been established as an international trade-fair centre and city of commerce in the Middle Ages: its autumn fair had been running since the 12th century and the spring fair since 1330. By around 1600, the book fair in this publishing city had already assumed international proportions. Frankfurt's commercial and fair activities meant that countless currencies were circulated. Around 1585, exchange rates and rules of trade were introduced, in a move seen as marking the birth of the Frankfurt stock exchange. In 1147 Frankfurt has also assured a unique position within the Empire as the site of the election of German kings, a role officially confirmed by the Golden Bull of 1356; from 1562 to 1792, the coronation of the Emperor also took place in Frankfurt cathedral. (Taschen)

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, also known as the 'Braun & Hogenberg', is a six-volume town atlas and the most excellent book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun, a skilled writer, wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. Many plates were engraved after the original drawings of a professional artist, Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600). The first volume was published in Latin in 1572 and the sixth in 1617. Frans Hogenberg, a talented engraver, created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel made those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographers Daniel Freese and Heinrich Rantzau, who provided valuable geographical information. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used as references. Translations appeared in German and French, making the atlas accessible to a wider audience.

Since its original publication of volume 1 in 1572, the Civitates Orbis Terrarum has left an indelible mark on the history of cartography. The first volume was followed by seven more editions in 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1612. Vol.2, initially released in 1575, saw subsequent editions in 1597 and 1612. The subsequent volumes, each a treasure trove of historical insights, graced the world in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1606. The German translation of the first volume, a testament to its widespread appeal, debuted in 1574, followed by the French edition in 1575.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz, and Peter von Brachel, all of whom worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun, the author of the text accompanying the plans and views in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne, he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice, indicating his commitment to learning and intellectual pursuits. In 1561, he obtained his bachelor's degree; in 1562, he received his Magister Artium, further demonstrating his academic achievements. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he continued his studies in theology, gaining a licentiate in theology. His theological background likely influenced the content and tone of the text in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, adding a unique perspective to the work.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s, Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named an engraver of numerous maps. In 1568, he was banned from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. He immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates, published in 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to large-scale projects like the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

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Civitas Francofordiana ad Moe:

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Item Number:  28905 Authenticity Guarantee

Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Germany - Cities

Old, antique bird’s-eye view plan of Frankfurt am Main by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg.

Title: Civitas Francofordiana ad Moe:
Cum privilegio.

Date of the first edition: 1572.
Date of this map: 1577.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Map size: 330 x 470mm (12.99 x 18.5 inches).
Sheet size: 380 x 520mm (14.96 x 20.47 inches).
Verso: Latin text.
Condition: Original coloured.
Condition Rating: A.

From: Civitates Orbis Terrarum, Liber Primus. Köln, Gottfried von Kempen, 1577. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:1.1)

TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Frankfurt is a unique city in East Franconia, or rather, at its extremity, lying on the Main, the most famous trade city in all of Germany, very well known amongst all the peoples of Europe; the Roman Emperor is elected here by the most illustrious College of Seven, the Electors, and the fencing masters designated. [...] In his treatise on Germany, Franciscus Irenicus attests that he has seen in a monastery a description of Frankfurt in seven books written by a deacon named Entrandus. Connected to Frankfurt by an elegant stone bridge is Sachsenhausen, a town of no ordinary magnificence. Frankfurt is surrounded by bulwarks, walls, ramparts and moats that are exceptionally well designed for defensive purposes.
 
COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The city's largest and most magnificent part is called Frankfurt, the other Sachsenhausen, which is also surrounded by walls and moats. Frankfurt is a leading centre of trade not just in Germany but in Europe. Twice a year, before Easter, in the middle of Lent, and autumn, large numbers of merchants come from Lower and Upper Germany and many other parts of the world to the annual fairs here. Emperor Charles IV also had a particular liking for this city, so he moved the election of the kings and emperors of the Romans to here and confirmed this in his Golden Bull."
 
An impressive bird's-eye view from the southwest of the powerful trade city of Frankfurt, in 1605, home to 20,000 people. St Batholomew's cathedral, the coronation church of the German kings and emperors, stands on the hill at the core of the original settlement on the right bank of the Main. On the Römerberg hill further left, the Römer and Goldener Schwan houses served as the town hall from 1405 onwards; to their right lies the Gothic councillors' church of St Nicholas. Identified in the Sachsenhausen quarter are the church of the Magi (H. Drei Konig), which became Frankfurt's first Protestant church in 1525, and the house of the Teutonic Knights (Teutsch Hauss). Frankfurt had been established as an international trade-fair centre and city of commerce in the Middle Ages: its autumn fair had been running since the 12th century and the spring fair since 1330. By around 1600, the book fair in this publishing city had already assumed international proportions. Frankfurt's commercial and fair activities meant that countless currencies were circulated. Around 1585, exchange rates and rules of trade were introduced, in a move seen as marking the birth of the Frankfurt stock exchange. In 1147 Frankfurt has also assured a unique position within the Empire as the site of the election of German kings, a role officially confirmed by the Golden Bull of 1356; from 1562 to 1792, the coronation of the Emperor also took place in Frankfurt cathedral. (Taschen)

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, also known as the 'Braun & Hogenberg', is a six-volume town atlas and the most excellent book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun, a skilled writer, wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. Many plates were engraved after the original drawings of a professional artist, Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600). The first volume was published in Latin in 1572 and the sixth in 1617. Frans Hogenberg, a talented engraver, created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel made those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographers Daniel Freese and Heinrich Rantzau, who provided valuable geographical information. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used as references. Translations appeared in German and French, making the atlas accessible to a wider audience.

Since its original publication of volume 1 in 1572, the Civitates Orbis Terrarum has left an indelible mark on the history of cartography. The first volume was followed by seven more editions in 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1612. Vol.2, initially released in 1575, saw subsequent editions in 1597 and 1612. The subsequent volumes, each a treasure trove of historical insights, graced the world in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1606. The German translation of the first volume, a testament to its widespread appeal, debuted in 1574, followed by the French edition in 1575.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz, and Peter von Brachel, all of whom worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun, the author of the text accompanying the plans and views in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne, he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice, indicating his commitment to learning and intellectual pursuits. In 1561, he obtained his bachelor's degree; in 1562, he received his Magister Artium, further demonstrating his academic achievements. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he continued his studies in theology, gaining a licentiate in theology. His theological background likely influenced the content and tone of the text in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, adding a unique perspective to the work.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s, Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named an engraver of numerous maps. In 1568, he was banned from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. He immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates, published in 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to large-scale projects like the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

References: Van der Krogt 4 - #1361; Taschen (Br. Hog.) - p.95; Fauser - #4072

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