This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product?

Ptolemy map of Scandinavia by Martin Waldseemüller.

This map, which is of vital importance to the study of the cartography of Scandinavia, presents some difficulties both as to its origin and its contents. Long years of intensive scientific research have solved most of the problems connected with its origin. The Dane Claudius Clavus, born in 1388 and also known as Clausson, Cymbricus, Svart or Niger, is considered the real father of this representation of Norden. Letters tell us that he stayed in Rome in 1423 or 1424 where he had contacts with people from learned circles. On these occasions there must have been some discussion about the imprecise representation of Norden on the medieval Ptolemy maps. As an expert on Scandinavia, Svart attempted to improve Ptolemaic knowledge: he drew up a list of coordinates and prepared probably two maps. Of the first, very primitive map ascribed to him, only one manuscript copy (1427) exists in Nancy in France. The later map contains much more detail and was distributed on a larger scale. It was probably prepared between 1425 and 1439. In addition to his personal knowledge, Clavus also assimilated information from Italian sea charts and other world-maps onto this map. Copies of the map have been found in manuscripts from 1466 onwards. They are the work of Nicolaus Germanus (also called Donis), a Benedictine monk of Reichenbach in South Germany, humanist, cartographer and printer. He printed the Ulm editions of Ptolemy's Geography in 1482 and 1486 and added five new maps to it. One of those new maps was this Tabula moderna Norbegie et Gottie. Before being printed in this version, it had already known a complex previous history. On the oldest version of the map Greenland is situated on the upper right side. In the south-west it almost touches the top of the north coast and the Hebrides and, from there, it continues in a north-easterly direction in the shape of a huge perninsula, connected to Scandinavia by a spit of land in the north (ultimus terminus terre habitabilis or Pilappelanth). On some copies Iceland is drawn halfway between Norway and Greenland whereas on other manuscripts only the island Thule or Belandia appears off the Norwegian south coast. The problem was solved rather inelegantly by shifting Greenland to the north-east of the Scandinavian Peninsula (Engronelandt, linked to Pilappelandt) and partly filling the vacant space with a still unrecognizable Iceland. This version can be found on a manuscript preserved in Brussels and on all printed copies of the maps. The different manuscripts and editions can be further distinguished by subtle variations in the configuration and, especially, in the spelling of the place-names. (Van Mingroot & Van Ermen)


Martin Waldseemüller (Ilacomilus) (c. 1473-1519)

Martin Walseemüller and his collaborator, Matthias Ringmann, are credited with the first recorded usage of the word America to name the New World in honour of the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci.
He was born about 1475, most probably in the village of Wolfenweiler near Freiburg im Breisgau (southern Germany). He studied at the University of Freiburg where he met Johann Scott, the future printer of Waldseemüller’s edition of Ptolemy and Matthias Ringman, a poet who wrote Waldseemüller’s texts. Gregor Reisch was their tutor. He was noted for a philosophical work, Margaretha Philosophica (1503), a widely read book of which included a world map in Ptolemaic form. He undoubtedly aroused the students’ interest in cosmography.
At the beginning of the 16th century, Walseemüller moved to St.Dié, in the Vosges. He Hellenized his name to Ilacomilus and worked on an edition of Ptolemy. He learned the printing trade in Basle and became professor of cosmography under the patronage of René II, Duke of Lorraine.
Together with a group of scholars, among them were Nicholas Lud and Matthias Ringmann, they installed a printing press in St. Dié. The first book appeared in 1507: Cosmographiae introductio … Few books have generated as much interest and speculation as this book because it contained the suggestion that the new continent is named America in honour of Amerigo Vespucci, whose letters about his American “discoveries” form a large part of the book. Great interest was also attached to the two maps mentioned on the title page as constituting part of the Cosmographiae introductio: a large 12-panel wall map of the world and a set of globe gores. The map and globe were notable for showing the New World as a continent separate from Asia and for naming the southern landmass America.
Ringmann wrote the text of the Cosmographiae introductio in which he used the name ‘America’. He died in 1511, and by then Waldseemüller was having doubts about the name they had coined.
In 1511 Walseemüller published the Carta Itineraria Europae, a road map of Europe that showed essential trade routes as well as pilgrim routes from central Europe to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. It was the first printed wall map of Europe.
After Ringmann’s death, Waldseemüller concentrated on the new version of Ptolemy’s Geographia. The new edition was finally printed in 1513 by Johannes Scott in Strasbourg and is now regarded as the most important edition. Waldseemüller included twenty modern maps in the new Geographia as a separate appendix.
The 1507 wall map was lost for a long time, but a copy was found in Schloss Wolfegg in southern Germany by Joseph Fischer in 1901. It is the only known copy and was purchased by the United States Library of Congress in May 2003.

back

Tabula Moderna Norbegie et Gottie, 1513.

€4900  ($5782 / £4508)
add to cart
questions?

Item Number:  924
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Northern Europe
References: Ginsberg (Scandinavia) - 5; Karrow - p.580 80/39; Van Mingroot-Van Ermen - 4

Old Ptolemy map of Scandinavia by Martin Waldseemüller.

Date of first edition: 1513
Date of this map: 1513

Woodcut
Size: 31.5 x 57 cm (12.4 x 22.44 inch) (height x width)
Verso: Blank
Condition: A number of wormholes filled.
Condition Rating: B
References: Ginsberg (Scandinavia), 5; Karrow, p.580 80/39; Van Mingroot-Van Ermen, 4

From: Claudii Ptolemei viri Alexandrini Mathematice discipline Philosophi dictissimi Geographiae opus novissima . . . Strassburg, J. Schott, 1513.

The difference with the 1520 edition is the letterpress used in the margins.

This map, which is of vital importance to the study of the cartography of Scandinavia, presents some difficulties both as to its origin and its contents. Long years of intensive scientific research have solved most of the problems connected with its origin. The Dane Claudius Clavus, born in 1388 and also known as Clausson, Cymbricus, Svart or Niger, is considered the real father of this representation of Norden. Letters tell us that he stayed in Rome in 1423 or 1424 where he had contacts with people from learned circles. On these occasions there must have been some discussion about the imprecise representation of Norden on the medieval Ptolemy maps. As an expert on Scandinavia, Svart attempted to improve Ptolemaic knowledge: he drew up a list of coordinates and prepared probably two maps. Of the first, very primitive map ascribed to him, only one manuscript copy (1427) exists in Nancy in France. The later map contains much more detail and was distributed on a larger scale. It was probably prepared between 1425 and 1439. In addition to his personal knowledge, Clavus also assimilated information from Italian sea charts and other world-maps onto this map. Copies of the map have been found in manuscripts from 1466 onwards. They are the work of Nicolaus Germanus (also called Donis), a Benedictine monk of Reichenbach in South Germany, humanist, cartographer and printer. He printed the Ulm editions of Ptolemy's Geography in 1482 and 1486 and added five new maps to it. One of those new maps was this Tabula moderna Norbegie et Gottie. Before being printed in this version, it had already known a complex previous history. On the oldest version of the map Greenland is situated on the upper right side. In the south-west it almost touches the top of the north coast and the Hebrides and, from there, it continues in a north-easterly direction in the shape of a huge perninsula, connected to Scandinavia by a spit of land in the north (ultimus terminus terre habitabilis or Pilappelanth). On some copies Iceland is drawn halfway between Norway and Greenland whereas on other manuscripts only the island Thule or Belandia appears off the Norwegian south coast. The problem was solved rather inelegantly by shifting Greenland to the north-east of the Scandinavian Peninsula (Engronelandt, linked to Pilappelandt) and partly filling the vacant space with a still unrecognizable Iceland. This version can be found on a manuscript preserved in Brussels and on all printed copies of the maps. The different manuscripts and editions can be further distinguished by subtle variations in the configuration and, especially, in the spelling of the place-names. (Van Mingroot & Van Ermen)


Martin Waldseemüller (Ilacomilus) (c. 1473-1519)

Martin Walseemüller and his collaborator, Matthias Ringmann, are credited with the first recorded usage of the word America to name the New World in honour of the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci.
He was born about 1475, most probably in the village of Wolfenweiler near Freiburg im Breisgau (southern Germany). He studied at the University of Freiburg where he met Johann Scott, the future printer of Waldseemüller’s edition of Ptolemy and Matthias Ringman, a poet who wrote Waldseemüller’s texts. Gregor Reisch was their tutor. He was noted for a philosophical work, Margaretha Philosophica (1503), a widely read book of which included a world map in Ptolemaic form. He undoubtedly aroused the students’ interest in cosmography.
At the beginning of the 16th century, Walseemüller moved to St.Dié, in the Vosges. He Hellenized his name to Ilacomilus and worked on an edition of Ptolemy. He learned the printing trade in Basle and became professor of cosmography under the patronage of René II, Duke of Lorraine.
Together with a group of scholars, among them were Nicholas Lud and Matthias Ringmann, they installed a printing press in St. Dié. The first book appeared in 1507: Cosmographiae introductio … Few books have generated as much interest and speculation as this book because it contained the suggestion that the new continent is named America in honour of Amerigo Vespucci, whose letters about his American “discoveries” form a large part of the book. Great interest was also attached to the two maps mentioned on the title page as constituting part of the Cosmographiae introductio: a large 12-panel wall map of the world and a set of globe gores. The map and globe were notable for showing the New World as a continent separate from Asia and for naming the southern landmass America.
Ringmann wrote the text of the Cosmographiae introductio in which he used the name ‘America’. He died in 1511, and by then Waldseemüller was having doubts about the name they had coined.
In 1511 Walseemüller published the Carta Itineraria Europae, a road map of Europe that showed essential trade routes as well as pilgrim routes from central Europe to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. It was the first printed wall map of Europe.
After Ringmann’s death, Waldseemüller concentrated on the new version of Ptolemy’s Geographia. The new edition was finally printed in 1513 by Johannes Scott in Strasbourg and is now regarded as the most important edition. Waldseemüller included twenty modern maps in the new Geographia as a separate appendix.
The 1507 wall map was lost for a long time, but a copy was found in Schloss Wolfegg in southern Germany by Joseph Fischer in 1901. It is the only known copy and was purchased by the United States Library of Congress in May 2003.

Related items

Old antique map of Southeast Asia by Martin Waldseemüller

Southeast Asia by Martin Waldseemüller
Undecima Asiae Tabula, 1513.
[Item number: 11993]

€2200  ($2596 / £2024)
Old antique chart of Scandinavia, by Michele Tramezini.

Scandinavia, by Michele Tramezini.
Septemtrionalium Regionum Svetiae Gothiae ..., 1558.
[Item number: 27045]

€16500  ($19470 / £15180)
Old antique map of Scandinavia by Olaus Magnus

Scandinavia by Olaus Magnus
Scandianae Insulae Index.[(letter-press title ..., 1554.
[Item number: 25939]

€4500  ($5310 / £4140)
Old antique map of Iceland, by W. Blaeu.

Iceland, by W. Blaeu.
Tabula Islandiae Auctore Georgio Carolo Flandro., 1643-50.
[Item number: 26533]

€1100  ($1298 / £1012)
Ptolemy map of Scandinavia, by Marcus Beneventanus.

Ptolemy map of Scandinavia, by Marcus Beneventanus.
Tabula Moderna Prussie - Livonie Norvegie et ... - Claudius Ptolemy, 1507.
[Item number: 4035]

€6500  ($7670 / £5980)
Old antique map of Scandinavia by G. de l'Isle, published by R. & I. Ottens.

Scandinavia by G. de l'Isle, published by R. & I. Ottens.
Carte la Plus Nouvelle de la Scandinivie ou les ..., c. 1745.
[Item number: 25858]

€650  ($767 / £598)
Old antique chart of Norway by J. Van Keulen.

Norway by J. Van Keulen.
Paskaart van de Kust van Noorwegen Beginnende van ..., 1697-1709.
[Item number: 11217]

€1000  ($1180 / £920)
Old antique map of Finland, Sweden, Latvia by Valk G. & L. - Ottens R. & I.

Finland, Sweden, Latvia by Valk G. & L. - Ottens R. & I.
Sueciae Magnae, totius Orbis Regniantiquissimi, ..., c. 1745.
[Item number: 25846]

€380  ($448.4 / £349.6)
Old antique map of Scandinavia by Olaus Magnus.

Scandinavia by Olaus Magnus.
Regnorum Aquilonarum descriptio, huius Operis ..., 1555.
[Item number: 25940]

€4500  ($5310 / £4140)
Old antique map of Scandinavia by Francesco Santini

Scandinavia by Francesco Santini
Les Royaumes de Suede et Norwege Divisés par ..., 1776.
[Item number: 26964]

€280  ($330.4 / £257.6)
Antique map of Russia - Nassau Strait by J. Blaeu.

Russia - Nassau Strait by J. Blaeu.
Fretum Nassovium Vulgo De Straet Nassou. - J. Blaeu.
[Item number: 14225]

€500  ($590 / £460)
Old, antique map of Finland - Sweden by Homann J.B.

Finland - Sweden by Homann J.B.
Regni Sueciae in Omnes suas Subjacentes ... - J.B. Homann.
[Item number: 23514]

€420  ($495.6 / £386.4)
Antique map of Lapland by F. de Wit - Covens & Mortier.

Lapland by F. de Wit - Covens & Mortier.
Suecicae Lapponiae et Norvegicae Nova Tabula - Frederik De Wit - Covens & Mortier.
[Item number: 23750]

€300  ($354 / £276)