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Sibernik, Porec and Modon, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

SIBENIK

CAPTION: Sibinium, for Ptolemy Sicum, commonly Sebenico, Dalmatian town.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Sibenik, which is called Sicum by the elderly and Sebenicho in their accustomed tongue, lies on the Adriatic Sea on the edge of Dalmatia and falls under the domain of the Venetians. Pliny says that Emperor Claudius provided for his old soldiers in this town."

Sibenik is depicted from the sea, overlooking the narrow harbour entrance to the sound with its St Nicolas's fort and two bastions. St Michael's (today St Anne's) fortress can be seen on the hill above the town. Sibenik was first mentioned in 1066. After multiple, alternating rulers in 1412 Sibenik was captured by the Venetians and remained under their rule until 1797. The three-nave cathedral, one of the most famous Dalmatian Renaissance structures, which was erected from 1431 to 1535 in honour of St James, can be made out with its characteristic domed crossing at the front centre; to the right is the church of St Francis. Sibenik lies on the Adriatic coast in Dalmatia, a region steeped in history, and today has 52,000 inhabitants.

POREC

CAPTION: Parens or Parentium, commonly Porec, a town in Istria.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Porec is a town in Dalmatia on the Adriatic Sea. Bernhard von Breydenbach writes about it in his Reise nach Jerusalem: As Paris wanted to abduct Helena, he had his ships fortified in this city. [...] From this town one can easily travel to Jerusalem, but obtaining a passport presents many difficulties since Dalmatians and Istrians have different rulers. [...] And since no one is allowed to tour this countryside, topographers and geographers have also produced little on it."

Porec is depicted from the sea as a well-fortified town with towers and solid walls, in the foreground is St Nicholas's Island with a Benedictine monastery. Behind the high walls, in the Euphrasius basilica from the 6th century, is identifiable on the left, and, on the right, the church of St Mary. The town was founded in c. 100 BC, after the Roman conquest of the resident Histri. Following the migration period Porec was under Byzantine rule for some 250 years, and, after alternating and unclear governance, the Venetians rose to power in 1267. Porec is today a major port on the west coast of Istria, with 17,000 residents.

METHONI

CAPTION: Modon or Modona, also Methoni, is a coastal town of the Peloponnese in the countryside of Morea.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The Turkish Sultan Bayezid II laid lengthy siege to Methoni; storming it simultaneously at three points. [...] As the town was now in great danger and there was little hope of holding out for long, four Venetian galleys came suddenly to the town's rescue, well outfitted with soldiers, provisions, munitions and weapons. Now, as every man ran excitedly from the town to the harbour to joyously welcome the reinforcements, all entrenchments and firing positions were abandoned by the soldiers. Meanwhile, all the Janizaries recognized the favourable opportunity and scaled the empty city walls, thus capturing the town on St Lawrence Day, 10 August 1500."

The plate is depicted from the sea and affords a direct view into the harbour of the well-fortified town. Methoni was referred to as Pedasus in Homer's Iliad and was undefeated in antiquity due to its natural harbour. At the beginning of the 2nd century AD, Emperor Trajan declared the town independent. In 395 it belonged to the Byzantine Empire. In 1124 Methoni was captured by the Venetians; in 1498 it was besieged by the Ottomans under Sultan Bayezid II and finally captured on 9 (not 10) August 1500.

The three views are made after woodcuts by Erhard Reuwich in Bernard von Breydenbach's Peregrinatio in terram sanctam, 1486. (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver on numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

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Sibinium, Ptolemeo Sicum vulgo Sibenicho. Dalmatie Opp. [on sheet with] Parens, sive Parentium vulgo, Parenzo Histriae Opp. [and] Modon, sive Modona, quondam Methone, Civitas est Littoralis Pelopponesi, in Morea. - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1597.

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Item Number:  27475  new
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Southeastern Europe
References: Van der Krogt 4 - #3985; Taschen, Br. Hog. - p.187; Fauser - #12968

Three old, antique bird's-eye views on one sheet: Sibernik, Porec and Modon, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Date of the first edition: 1575
Date of this map: 1597

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 35 x 49.5cm (13.7 x 19.2 inches)
Verso text: Latin
Condition: Excellent, superb old colour.
Condition Rating: A+
References: Van der Krogt 4, #3985; Taschen, Br. Hog., p.187; Fauser, #12968, #10582, and #8789.

From: Civitates Orbis Terrarum, ... Part 2: De Praecipuis, Totius Universi Urbibus, Liber Secundus. Köln, Bertram Buchholz, 1597. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:1.2)

SIBENIK

CAPTION: Sibinium, for Ptolemy Sicum, commonly Sebenico, Dalmatian town.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Sibenik, which is called Sicum by the elderly and Sebenicho in their accustomed tongue, lies on the Adriatic Sea on the edge of Dalmatia and falls under the domain of the Venetians. Pliny says that Emperor Claudius provided for his old soldiers in this town."

Sibenik is depicted from the sea, overlooking the narrow harbour entrance to the sound with its St Nicolas's fort and two bastions. St Michael's (today St Anne's) fortress can be seen on the hill above the town. Sibenik was first mentioned in 1066. After multiple, alternating rulers in 1412 Sibenik was captured by the Venetians and remained under their rule until 1797. The three-nave cathedral, one of the most famous Dalmatian Renaissance structures, which was erected from 1431 to 1535 in honour of St James, can be made out with its characteristic domed crossing at the front centre; to the right is the church of St Francis. Sibenik lies on the Adriatic coast in Dalmatia, a region steeped in history, and today has 52,000 inhabitants.

POREC

CAPTION: Parens or Parentium, commonly Porec, a town in Istria.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Porec is a town in Dalmatia on the Adriatic Sea. Bernhard von Breydenbach writes about it in his Reise nach Jerusalem: As Paris wanted to abduct Helena, he had his ships fortified in this city. [...] From this town one can easily travel to Jerusalem, but obtaining a passport presents many difficulties since Dalmatians and Istrians have different rulers. [...] And since no one is allowed to tour this countryside, topographers and geographers have also produced little on it."

Porec is depicted from the sea as a well-fortified town with towers and solid walls, in the foreground is St Nicholas's Island with a Benedictine monastery. Behind the high walls, in the Euphrasius basilica from the 6th century, is identifiable on the left, and, on the right, the church of St Mary. The town was founded in c. 100 BC, after the Roman conquest of the resident Histri. Following the migration period Porec was under Byzantine rule for some 250 years, and, after alternating and unclear governance, the Venetians rose to power in 1267. Porec is today a major port on the west coast of Istria, with 17,000 residents.

METHONI

CAPTION: Modon or Modona, also Methoni, is a coastal town of the Peloponnese in the countryside of Morea.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The Turkish Sultan Bayezid II laid lengthy siege to Methoni; storming it simultaneously at three points. [...] As the town was now in great danger and there was little hope of holding out for long, four Venetian galleys came suddenly to the town's rescue, well outfitted with soldiers, provisions, munitions and weapons. Now, as every man ran excitedly from the town to the harbour to joyously welcome the reinforcements, all entrenchments and firing positions were abandoned by the soldiers. Meanwhile, all the Janizaries recognized the favourable opportunity and scaled the empty city walls, thus capturing the town on St Lawrence Day, 10 August 1500."

The plate is depicted from the sea and affords a direct view into the harbour of the well-fortified town. Methoni was referred to as Pedasus in Homer's Iliad and was undefeated in antiquity due to its natural harbour. At the beginning of the 2nd century AD, Emperor Trajan declared the town independent. In 395 it belonged to the Byzantine Empire. In 1124 Methoni was captured by the Venetians; in 1498 it was besieged by the Ottomans under Sultan Bayezid II and finally captured on 9 (not 10) August 1500.

The three views are made after woodcuts by Erhard Reuwich in Bernard von Breydenbach's Peregrinatio in terram sanctam, 1486. (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver on numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.