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Antique map of Seville (Sevilla) - Cadiz - Malaga by Braun & Hogenberg 1572-1624

SEVILLA

TRANSLATION OF THE CARTOUCHE TEXT: Hispalis, Tarapha's Seville, famous and ancient trade centre in the province of Baetica in Spain, which embellishes the Gulf of Cadiz through its most delightful position.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Seville is the most important city of trade in all Spain, able to reap incredible gains from the most diverse places in the world, but primarily from India, which lies towards the west. Furthermore, this city enjoys a more favourable position than the other Spanish cities since its fertile fields bring forth oils and olives and highly productive trees with palm fruits and lemons, lending truth to the saying: "Those whom God loves, He gives a house and a living in Seville."

This view of Seville presents the city from the southeast, seen at a distance from the far side of the Guadalquivir, from land now occupied by the Barrio de Triana. Visible on the right side of the city is the Castillio, which has caught on fire; the fortress, with its many towers, was then the seat of the Inquisition. On the left bank of the river, opposite the Castillio, lies the Torre del Oro; further left is the Alcazar, whose originally Almohad architecture was remodelled in the Mudéjar style in the 14th century. Rising above the city centre is the Gothic cathedral (Yglesia maior), which houses the tomb of Columbus. The tall belltower, called the "Giralda", was formerly a minaret and is today one of the city's landmarks. Seville profited greatly from trade with the New World. From 1537 fleets laden with wine, salt, corn, pottery, and silk sailed regularly between the continents.

CADIZ

TRANSLATION OF THE CARTOUCHE TEXT: Cadiz, formerly Gades, famous town on the island of the same name, noteworthy for its port, the Strait of Hercules and its church.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The Island of Cadiz is not far from the mainland. However, the town that one sees today was not built on the old foundations because its location has now shifted eastwards. Strabo, however, writes that the town lay on an island further to the west, evidence for which can still be seen near St Catherine's chapel. Large broken stones are visible when the sea recedes, which are alleged to be the foundations of ruined houses. The divers also relate that they have seen their huge doorposts, beams and lattice doors (that tear the fishermen's nets), and from this, it is possible to estimate the limits of the old town."

Cadiz is shown from a cavalier perspective. Vestiges of the Moorish settlement that flourished here from the 8th to the 13th century can be seen in the centre of the fortified town: the large church, today occupied by the 18th-century cathedral and the fortress. Particular emphasis is placed upon the fishing industry, from which the town lived before it became a major trade centre. In the 16th century, Cadiz served as the "gateway to America": Columbus embarked upon his second and fourth expeditions from Cadiz harbour. The town later became the home port of the Spanish treasure fleet - and thereby found itself at the centre of Spain's military activities. From 1537 onwards, maritime trade with the New World assumed a more organized form, with a treasure fleet sailing annually between Cadiz, Seville and the colonies. Cadiz's most important export was salt.

MALAGA

TRANSLATION OF THE CARTOUCHE TEXT: Malaga is the name of a well-fortified and well-designed town on a very fertile site in the Spanish province of Baetica, lying directly beside the sea, which was founded by the Phoenicians, as recounted by Francisco Tarapha in his chronicle. [...] Malaga is today an important bishopric distinguished by its commerce and craft, particularly by its skilfully decorated earthenware, exported from here worldwide.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Malaga is important for its position and its trade and is distinguished by its abundance of all the vital necessities of life. Large numbers of merchants, chiefly from the Netherlandish and German towns, come here to buy the excellent wines produced by the local vineyards, proving to be a very good business. On the other hand, Malaga is also a bulwark against various enemies; for this reason, the King of Spain has established his arsenal here, from where he safeguards his rule in his African cities at no small cost."

The illustration focuses particularly on the harbour and, thus, upon the town's associated importance as a trade centre. Malaga's occupation by the Moors, which lasted over 700 years and ended only in 1487, in the wake of the Reconquista by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, is reflected in the large 11th-century Moorish fortress complex (centre). This is divided into two parts: the lower and the upper fortress (Alcazaca and Gibralfaro). The cathedral (La Yglesia maior) was built after 1528 on top of the former main mosque. It was never completed and is therefore known as "La Manquita" (the one-armed lady). (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, also known as the 'Braun & Hogenberg', is a six-volume town atlas and the most excellent book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun, a skilled writer, wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. Many plates were engraved after the original drawings of a professional artist, Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600). The first volume was published in Latin in 1572 and the sixth in 1617. Frans Hogenberg, a talented engraver, created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel made those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographers Daniel Freese and Heinrich Rantzau, who provided valuable geographical information. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used as references. Translations appeared in German and French, making the atlas accessible to a wider audience.

Since its original publication of volume 1 in 1572, the Civitates Orbis Terrarum has left an indelible mark on the history of cartography. The first volume was followed by seven more editions in 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1612. Vol.2, initially released in 1575, saw subsequent editions in 1597 and 1612. The subsequent volumes, each a treasure trove of historical insights, graced the world in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1606. The German translation of the first volume, a testament to its widespread appeal, debuted in 1574, followed by the French edition in 1575.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz, and Peter von Brachel, all of whom worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun, the author of the text accompanying the plans and views in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne, he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice, indicating his commitment to learning and intellectual pursuits. In 1561, he obtained his bachelor's degree; in 1562, he received his Magister Artium, further demonstrating his academic achievements. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he continued his studies in theology, gaining a licentiate in theology. His theological background likely influenced the content and tone of the text in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, adding a unique perspective to the work.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s, Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named an engraver of numerous maps. In 1568, he was banned from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. He immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates, published in 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to large-scale projects like the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

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Sevilla, Hispalis ... [on sheet with] Cadiz [and] Malaga.

€470  ($498.2 / £399.5)
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Item Number:  22685 Authenticity Guarantee

Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Spain and Portugal

Three views on one sheet: Seville, Cadiz, Malaga, by Braun & Hogenberg.

Title: Sevilla, Hispalis ... [on sheet with] Cadiz [and] Malaga.

Date: 1572-1624.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 330 x 480mm (12.99 x 18.9 inches).
Verso: Latin text.
Condition: Original coloured, lower left corner repaired, lower centrefold split reinforced.
Condition Rating: A.

From: Civitates Orbis Terrarum, ... Part 1. Köln, 1572-1624. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:1.1)

SEVILLA

TRANSLATION OF THE CARTOUCHE TEXT: Hispalis, Tarapha's Seville, famous and ancient trade centre in the province of Baetica in Spain, which embellishes the Gulf of Cadiz through its most delightful position.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Seville is the most important city of trade in all Spain, able to reap incredible gains from the most diverse places in the world, but primarily from India, which lies towards the west. Furthermore, this city enjoys a more favourable position than the other Spanish cities since its fertile fields bring forth oils and olives and highly productive trees with palm fruits and lemons, lending truth to the saying: "Those whom God loves, He gives a house and a living in Seville."

This view of Seville presents the city from the southeast, seen at a distance from the far side of the Guadalquivir, from land now occupied by the Barrio de Triana. Visible on the right side of the city is the Castillio, which has caught on fire; the fortress, with its many towers, was then the seat of the Inquisition. On the left bank of the river, opposite the Castillio, lies the Torre del Oro; further left is the Alcazar, whose originally Almohad architecture was remodelled in the Mudéjar style in the 14th century. Rising above the city centre is the Gothic cathedral (Yglesia maior), which houses the tomb of Columbus. The tall belltower, called the "Giralda", was formerly a minaret and is today one of the city's landmarks. Seville profited greatly from trade with the New World. From 1537 fleets laden with wine, salt, corn, pottery, and silk sailed regularly between the continents.

CADIZ

TRANSLATION OF THE CARTOUCHE TEXT: Cadiz, formerly Gades, famous town on the island of the same name, noteworthy for its port, the Strait of Hercules and its church.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The Island of Cadiz is not far from the mainland. However, the town that one sees today was not built on the old foundations because its location has now shifted eastwards. Strabo, however, writes that the town lay on an island further to the west, evidence for which can still be seen near St Catherine's chapel. Large broken stones are visible when the sea recedes, which are alleged to be the foundations of ruined houses. The divers also relate that they have seen their huge doorposts, beams and lattice doors (that tear the fishermen's nets), and from this, it is possible to estimate the limits of the old town."

Cadiz is shown from a cavalier perspective. Vestiges of the Moorish settlement that flourished here from the 8th to the 13th century can be seen in the centre of the fortified town: the large church, today occupied by the 18th-century cathedral and the fortress. Particular emphasis is placed upon the fishing industry, from which the town lived before it became a major trade centre. In the 16th century, Cadiz served as the "gateway to America": Columbus embarked upon his second and fourth expeditions from Cadiz harbour. The town later became the home port of the Spanish treasure fleet - and thereby found itself at the centre of Spain's military activities. From 1537 onwards, maritime trade with the New World assumed a more organized form, with a treasure fleet sailing annually between Cadiz, Seville and the colonies. Cadiz's most important export was salt.

MALAGA

TRANSLATION OF THE CARTOUCHE TEXT: Malaga is the name of a well-fortified and well-designed town on a very fertile site in the Spanish province of Baetica, lying directly beside the sea, which was founded by the Phoenicians, as recounted by Francisco Tarapha in his chronicle. [...] Malaga is today an important bishopric distinguished by its commerce and craft, particularly by its skilfully decorated earthenware, exported from here worldwide.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Malaga is important for its position and its trade and is distinguished by its abundance of all the vital necessities of life. Large numbers of merchants, chiefly from the Netherlandish and German towns, come here to buy the excellent wines produced by the local vineyards, proving to be a very good business. On the other hand, Malaga is also a bulwark against various enemies; for this reason, the King of Spain has established his arsenal here, from where he safeguards his rule in his African cities at no small cost."

The illustration focuses particularly on the harbour and, thus, upon the town's associated importance as a trade centre. Malaga's occupation by the Moors, which lasted over 700 years and ended only in 1487, in the wake of the Reconquista by King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, is reflected in the large 11th-century Moorish fortress complex (centre). This is divided into two parts: the lower and the upper fortress (Alcazaca and Gibralfaro). The cathedral (La Yglesia maior) was built after 1528 on top of the former main mosque. It was never completed and is therefore known as "La Manquita" (the one-armed lady). (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, also known as the 'Braun & Hogenberg', is a six-volume town atlas and the most excellent book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun, a skilled writer, wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. Many plates were engraved after the original drawings of a professional artist, Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600). The first volume was published in Latin in 1572 and the sixth in 1617. Frans Hogenberg, a talented engraver, created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel made those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographers Daniel Freese and Heinrich Rantzau, who provided valuable geographical information. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used as references. Translations appeared in German and French, making the atlas accessible to a wider audience.

Since its original publication of volume 1 in 1572, the Civitates Orbis Terrarum has left an indelible mark on the history of cartography. The first volume was followed by seven more editions in 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1612. Vol.2, initially released in 1575, saw subsequent editions in 1597 and 1612. The subsequent volumes, each a treasure trove of historical insights, graced the world in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1606. The German translation of the first volume, a testament to its widespread appeal, debuted in 1574, followed by the French edition in 1575.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz, and Peter von Brachel, all of whom worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun, the author of the text accompanying the plans and views in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne, he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice, indicating his commitment to learning and intellectual pursuits. In 1561, he obtained his bachelor's degree; in 1562, he received his Magister Artium, further demonstrating his academic achievements. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he continued his studies in theology, gaining a licentiate in theology. His theological background likely influenced the content and tone of the text in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, adding a unique perspective to the work.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s, Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named an engraver of numerous maps. In 1568, he was banned from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. He immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates, published in 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to large-scale projects like the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

References: Van der Krogt 4 - 3973 state 2; Taschen (Br. Hog.) - p.50

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