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Lisbon + Cascais, by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg. 1593

LISBON

TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Olisippo, or as can be read in inscriptions on ancient stones, Ulysippo, commonly known as Lisbon, is a flourishing trade centre in Portugal.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "Lisbon can be counted amongst the oldest Spanish cities. Originally founded on a high hill on the banks of the Tejo, the city now covers numerous mountains and valleys. On this site can be found an old and rambling royal palace, magnificently decorated: to the north lies an important convent belonging to the Poor Clares, somewhat secluded on the River Tejo."

Lisbon's appearance in second place in the Civitates is certainly no accident, since by the start of the 16th century Lisbon already numbered 350,000 inhabitants and thus ranked amongst the largest of all the most famous cities. The densely packed houses in the engraving underline this fact. Emphasis is also placed upon the harbour and shipyards, highlighting Lisbon's importance as a cosmopolitan centre of trade. Lisbon was the Portuguese city that profited the most from the expansion of the Portuguese global empire, which began in 1499 after Vasco da Gama's voyages of discovery and led to the colonies in Asia and South America. Pope Alexander VI also underlined Portugal's importance with the coronation of Manuel I as "Lord of the conquest, navigation and commerce of India, Ethiopia, Arabia and Persia."

CASCAIS AND BELÉM

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "North of Lisbon lies the town of Cascale, which is particularly suitable as a safe harbour owing to its natural possition with many inlets, since the big ships can find a sheltered anchorage here during rough seas and can wait for a fair wind. [...] In a winding bay on the same shoreline lies the small town of Belém with a mighty church that is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary."

Cascais and Belém are two small towns in the vicinity of Lisbon. They are seen in a low, bird's-eye perspective from the sea. The fishing village of Cascais, today a tourist destination and a popular beach resort, lies on a bay on the Atlantic coast some 25 km west of Lisbon. Belém was incorporated into Lisbon in 1885 and lies to the west of the city centre. The church of Santa Maria mentioned by Braun served the former Hieronymite monastery (c. 1502-1572). (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

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Lisbon + Cascais, by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg.

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Item Number:  27971
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Spain and Portugal
References: Van der Krogt 4 - #2412; Fauser - #7858 - #2386; Taschen, Br. Hog. - p. 50

Old, antique bird’s-eye view of Lisbon + Cascale, by Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg.

Title: Lisbona. Olisipo ... vulgo Lisbona Florentissimum Portugalliae Emporiv. [on sheet with] Cascale Lusitaniae Opp.
Cum Privilegio.

Date of the first edition: 1572.
Date of this map: 1593.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 350 x 480mm (13.78 x 18.9 inches).
Verso: French text.
Condition: Original coloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A+.
References: Van der Krogt 4, 2412, State 2; Fauser, 7858-2383; Taschen, Br. Hog., p.50

From: Braun G. & Hogenberg F. Théatre des Cités du Monde. Premier Volume. Cologne, Gottfried von Kempen (?), c. 1593. (Van der Krogt 41:3.1)

LISBON

TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Olisippo, or as can be read in inscriptions on ancient stones, Ulysippo, commonly known as Lisbon, is a flourishing trade centre in Portugal.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "Lisbon can be counted amongst the oldest Spanish cities. Originally founded on a high hill on the banks of the Tejo, the city now covers numerous mountains and valleys. On this site can be found an old and rambling royal palace, magnificently decorated: to the north lies an important convent belonging to the Poor Clares, somewhat secluded on the River Tejo."

Lisbon's appearance in second place in the Civitates is certainly no accident, since by the start of the 16th century Lisbon already numbered 350,000 inhabitants and thus ranked amongst the largest of all the most famous cities. The densely packed houses in the engraving underline this fact. Emphasis is also placed upon the harbour and shipyards, highlighting Lisbon's importance as a cosmopolitan centre of trade. Lisbon was the Portuguese city that profited the most from the expansion of the Portuguese global empire, which began in 1499 after Vasco da Gama's voyages of discovery and led to the colonies in Asia and South America. Pope Alexander VI also underlined Portugal's importance with the coronation of Manuel I as "Lord of the conquest, navigation and commerce of India, Ethiopia, Arabia and Persia."

CASCAIS AND BELÉM

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "North of Lisbon lies the town of Cascale, which is particularly suitable as a safe harbour owing to its natural possition with many inlets, since the big ships can find a sheltered anchorage here during rough seas and can wait for a fair wind. [...] In a winding bay on the same shoreline lies the small town of Belém with a mighty church that is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary."

Cascais and Belém are two small towns in the vicinity of Lisbon. They are seen in a low, bird's-eye perspective from the sea. The fishing village of Cascais, today a tourist destination and a popular beach resort, lies on a bay on the Atlantic coast some 25 km west of Lisbon. Belém was incorporated into Lisbon in 1885 and lies to the west of the city centre. The church of Santa Maria mentioned by Braun served the former Hieronymite monastery (c. 1502-1572). (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.