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Ancient Low Countries, by Petrus Kaerius (Pieter Van den Keere). 1617

Pieter Van den Keere (Petrus Kaerius) (1571-c.1650)

Pieter van den Keere was born in Ghent in 1571 as the son of the type-founder, Hendrik van den Keere. In 1584, he moved with his family to London for religious reasons. There, Van den Keere received training as an engraver from Jodocus Hondius, his brother-in-law. Not only the companionship with Jodocus Hondius but also the acquaintanceship with Pieter van den Berghe (Petrus Montanus), author of the text of the Germania Inferior, originates from the years of refuge in London.
Upon their settlement in Amsterdam in 1593, both Keere and Hondius embarked on a monumental project. Their collaboration resulted in the creation of a large wall map of Europe, a masterpiece that still stands as a testament to their skill and vision, dated 1595: Nova totius Europae descriptio.
In 1610, he set up a workshop in the Kalverstraat that he called ‘In den onseeckeren tijd’ (In the uncertain time). During this period, he made numerous copperplates, including maps for his Atlas of the Netherlands and the Atlas Minor published by Jodocus Hondius.
The Germania Inferior (1617) is the first original atlas of the Netherlands published in folio size. The text for the atlas, both in Dutch and in French, was written by Petrus Montanus. After 1623, Claes Jansz. Visscher bought the plates and substituted his name for Kaerius’s. In 1634, Visscher included many of these maps in his Germana Inferior.
Kaerius's fame is not only based on his atlas of the Netherlands. He is even better known as an engraver of many loose-leaf maps and as a collaborator of book publishers. His maps are found, i.e., in the Caert thresoor (Barent Langenes, 1598), Licht der Zeevaert (Blaeu, 1608), Atlas Minor (Hondius, 1628), and Caertboeck vande Midellandsche Zee (Barents, 1595).

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Belgii Veteris Typus.

€360  ($385.2 / £306)
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Item Number:  28069 Authenticity Guarantee

Category:  Antique maps > Europe > The Low Countries

Old, antique map of the ancient Low Countries, by Petrus Kaerius (Pieter Van den Keere).

Title: Belgii Veteris Typus.
Ex Conatibus Geographicis Abrahami Ortelij.
Petrus Kaerius Celavit & Excud Amsteloda.

Cartographer: Abraham Ortelius.
Engraver: Petrus Kaerius.

Date of the first edition: 1617.
Date of this map: 1617.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 382 x 498mm (15.04 x 19.61 inches).
Verso: Latin text.
Condition: Uncoloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A+.
References: Van der Krogt 3, 3000H:364A; Van der Heijden (Netherlands), 82, First state

From: Petri Kaerii Germania Inferior id est, XVII provinciarum ejus novae et exactae Tabulae Geographicae, cum Luculentis Singularum descriptionibus additis. À Petro Montano. Amsterdam, 1617. (Koeman, Kee1; Van der Krogt 3, 64:01)

Pieter Van den Keere (Petrus Kaerius) (1571-c.1650)

Pieter van den Keere was born in Ghent in 1571 as the son of the type-founder, Hendrik van den Keere. In 1584, he moved with his family to London for religious reasons. There, Van den Keere received training as an engraver from Jodocus Hondius, his brother-in-law. Not only the companionship with Jodocus Hondius but also the acquaintanceship with Pieter van den Berghe (Petrus Montanus), author of the text of the Germania Inferior, originates from the years of refuge in London.
Upon their settlement in Amsterdam in 1593, both Keere and Hondius embarked on a monumental project. Their collaboration resulted in the creation of a large wall map of Europe, a masterpiece that still stands as a testament to their skill and vision, dated 1595: Nova totius Europae descriptio.
In 1610, he set up a workshop in the Kalverstraat that he called ‘In den onseeckeren tijd’ (In the uncertain time). During this period, he made numerous copperplates, including maps for his Atlas of the Netherlands and the Atlas Minor published by Jodocus Hondius.
The Germania Inferior (1617) is the first original atlas of the Netherlands published in folio size. The text for the atlas, both in Dutch and in French, was written by Petrus Montanus. After 1623, Claes Jansz. Visscher bought the plates and substituted his name for Kaerius’s. In 1634, Visscher included many of these maps in his Germana Inferior.
Kaerius's fame is not only based on his atlas of the Netherlands. He is even better known as an engraver of many loose-leaf maps and as a collaborator of book publishers. His maps are found, i.e., in the Caert thresoor (Barent Langenes, 1598), Licht der Zeevaert (Blaeu, 1608), Atlas Minor (Hondius, 1628), and Caertboeck vande Midellandsche Zee (Barents, 1595).

References: Van der Krogt 3 - 3000H:364A; Van der Heijden (Netherlands) - 82