This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product? (#28374)

California by Cornelis van Wytfliet. 1597

This is one of two maps that are of the west coast of North America. One of the most exciting features is depicting so many fabled places, mainly from Spanish sources. Most notable amongst these are the seven cities of Cibola, Septem ciuitatum Patria, shown surrounding a lake, which flows a river that empties into the MAR VERMEIO or the Gulf of California. The seven cities originated from the narrative of Fray Marcos de Niza in 1539. The lake's existence was due to Antonio de Espejo, who was sent out as a rescue party in 1582 to find three missing Franciscan friars; he told of a large inland lake on his return. The account of this voyage was first published in Madrid, 1586. Some of the other terminologies originate from Coronado's epic exploration.

The outline of the map is pretty accurate and is derived mainly from Petrus Plancius' large world map of 1592. The prominent coastal irregularity is the westward slant of the Californian coastline. This is entirely forgivable, bearing in mind that it would be shown as part of an island in twenty-five years. (Burden)


Cornelius Wytfliet (? – 1597)

Cornelius Wytfliet was a geographer from Leuven. After graduating Licentiate in Laws from the University of Leuven, Wytfliet moved to Brussels and became secretary to the Council of Brabant.
In 1597 he published the first atlas of America: the Descriptionis Ptolemaicae Augmentum (Augmentation to Ptolemy’s description). He named his work an augmentation to Ptolemy’s Geography because it covers the Americas, a part of the world unknown to Ptolemy. However, there is no other connection between the works of Ptolemy and Van Wytfliet. Dedicated to Philip III of Spain it is a history of the New World to date, recording its discovery, natural history, etc. It provides a history of exploration and the voyages of Christopher Columbus (1492-1502), John Cabot (1497-98), Sebastian Cabot (1526-28), Francisco Pizarro (1527-35), Giovanni de Verazzano (1524), Jacques Cartier (1540-42), and Martin Frobisher (1576-78). Most of Van Wytfliet’s maps are the first or among the earliest of specific regions of North and South America.
For the book, Wytfliet had engraved nineteen maps, one of the world and eighteen regional maps of the Americas. The book was an immediate success and ran to several editions.
Two editions of the Descriptionis Ptolemaicae were published et Leuven in 1597 and 1598. In 1603 appeared the first Douai edition with later editions with French text. The last edition was published in Arnhem in 1615.

back

Granata Nova et California.

€3400  ($3876 / £2890)
add to cart
questions?

Item Number:  28374  new
Category:  Antique maps > America > North America
References: Burden - #106; Van der Krogt 3 - 9530:371; Wagner - #188

Old, antique map of California, by Cornelis van Wytfliet.

Title: Granata Nova et California.

Date of the first edition: 1597.
Date of this map: 1597.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Map size: 230 x 290mm (9.06 x 11.42 inches).
Sheet size: 305 x 350mm (12.01 x 13.78 inches).
Verso: Blank.
Condition: Excellent.
Condition Rating: A+.
References: Burden, #106; Van der Krogt 3, 9530:371 Variant b; Wagner, #188

From: Descriptionis Ptolemaicae Augmentum. Louvain, J. Bogard, 1597. (Van der Krogt 3, 371:01)

This is one of two maps that are of the west coast of North America. One of the most exciting features is depicting so many fabled places, mainly from Spanish sources. Most notable amongst these are the seven cities of Cibola, Septem ciuitatum Patria, shown surrounding a lake, which flows a river that empties into the MAR VERMEIO or the Gulf of California. The seven cities originated from the narrative of Fray Marcos de Niza in 1539. The lake's existence was due to Antonio de Espejo, who was sent out as a rescue party in 1582 to find three missing Franciscan friars; he told of a large inland lake on his return. The account of this voyage was first published in Madrid, 1586. Some of the other terminologies originate from Coronado's epic exploration.

The outline of the map is pretty accurate and is derived mainly from Petrus Plancius' large world map of 1592. The prominent coastal irregularity is the westward slant of the Californian coastline. This is entirely forgivable, bearing in mind that it would be shown as part of an island in twenty-five years. (Burden)


Cornelius Wytfliet (? – 1597)

Cornelius Wytfliet was a geographer from Leuven. After graduating Licentiate in Laws from the University of Leuven, Wytfliet moved to Brussels and became secretary to the Council of Brabant.
In 1597 he published the first atlas of America: the Descriptionis Ptolemaicae Augmentum (Augmentation to Ptolemy’s description). He named his work an augmentation to Ptolemy’s Geography because it covers the Americas, a part of the world unknown to Ptolemy. However, there is no other connection between the works of Ptolemy and Van Wytfliet. Dedicated to Philip III of Spain it is a history of the New World to date, recording its discovery, natural history, etc. It provides a history of exploration and the voyages of Christopher Columbus (1492-1502), John Cabot (1497-98), Sebastian Cabot (1526-28), Francisco Pizarro (1527-35), Giovanni de Verazzano (1524), Jacques Cartier (1540-42), and Martin Frobisher (1576-78). Most of Van Wytfliet’s maps are the first or among the earliest of specific regions of North and South America.
For the book, Wytfliet had engraved nineteen maps, one of the world and eighteen regional maps of the Americas. The book was an immediate success and ran to several editions.
Two editions of the Descriptionis Ptolemaicae were published et Leuven in 1597 and 1598. In 1603 appeared the first Douai edition with later editions with French text. The last edition was published in Arnhem in 1615.