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Saarburg and Pfalzel, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

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Chorographica descriptio Civitatis Sarburgensis [on sheet with] Opp: Palatinum ad Mosellam Flu; vulgo Pfaltz auff der Musell. - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1596/97.

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Item Number:  24157
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Germany - Cities

Old map with two bird's-eye views by Braun and Hogenberg: Saarburg and Pfalzel.

SAARBURG

CARTOUCHE: Accurate overview of the town of Saarburg.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "The small town of Saarburg in the archbischopric of Trier, situated on the Saar, is little known amongst chroniclers and hence almost nothing is written about its origins and background. [...] A stone bridge, which is called the Kunz bridge after the neighbouring village, crosses the Saar not far from the Moselle. [...] At both ends of the bridge stands a tower in which watch is kept."

The Trier electoral palace and the town around it are seen from Beurig on the right bank of the Saar, today a suburb of Saarburg castle (top right), the later residence of the Trier archbishops, is first mentioned in the 10th century, although the settlement that sprang up beneath it was granted its municipal charter as early as 1291. In the 16th century the town comprised 100 homes of ordinary citizens (that is, not including those of the nobility or clergy). On the left the parish church of St Lawrence lies in the immediate vicinity of Saarburg's main attraction, a waterfall, where the Leuk Stream plunges 20 m over rocks. The Kautenturm, on the far left, is a tower that today marks the edge of the Old Town. Saarburg, in the Rhineland-Palatinate, currently has some 6,000 inhabitants.

PFALZEL AN DER MOSEL

CARTOUCHE: The town of Palatinum ad Mosellam, known in German as Pfalzel an der Mosel.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN (on verso): "Not far from Trier, further down the Moselle on the left bank, lies a small town with a castle, called Pfalzel. Its origins are thought to date from the time of King Dagobert in France. In ancient manuscripts and chronicles in the Horrem monastery, at least, it is written that Pfalzel numbered amongst the suburbs of Trier in AD 642, around which time the bishop of Trier furnished this place with a nunnery for noblewomen, whose first abbess was Adela and after whom Pfalzel was subsequently named."

The lower view shows the small town of Pfalzel an der Mosel in what is almost a bird's-eye view. In the centre the electoral palace of the Trier bishops rises above the surrounding houses. It was erected within the western half of the ruins of the Palatiolum (small imperial palace), a Roman complex probably constructed in the 4th century AD and once thought to have belonged to Caesar. Adela of Pfalzel founded the nunnery of St Mary, which dates back to the 10th century. Visitors today can still admire extensive sections of Pfalzel's unmistakable ramparts with their six original large bastions, of which the Moselle Bastion is the best preserved. (Taschen)

Date of the first edition: 1596
Date of this map: 1596

Copper engraving
Size: 32 x 44cm (12.5 x 17.2 inches)
Verso text: Latin
Condition: Uncoloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A
References: Van der Krogt 4, 3801; Taschen, Braun and Hogenberg, p. 380.

From: Urbium Praecipuarum Mundi Theatrum Quintum Auctore Georgio Braunio Agrippinate. Part 5. Köln, 1596/97. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:1.5)

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.