This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product? (#14608)

Acquapendente and Tarvisio by Braun and Hogenberg. c. 1610

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

back

Aquapendente [on sheet with] Tarvisi.

€500  ($525 / £420)
add to cart
questions?

Item Number:  14608
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Italy - Cities

Antique map - views of Acquapendente and Tarvisio by Braun and Hogenberg after G. Hoefnagel and Ludovico Toeput.

ACQUAPENDENTE

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Acquapendente is a small, strung-out town on a mountain, on the road from Siena to Rome, between the Lago di Bolsena and the River Paglia, which is crossed by a bridge with six spans."

The view from the west highlights the town's dramatic location on a precipitous rock terrace. On the left of the town lies the cathedral of San Sepolcro and in the centre the church of San Francesco, whose prominent bell tower dates from the Renaissance. On top of the hill on the far right lies the Monastero di Santa Chiara, built in 1333 on a site formerly occupied by an imperial fortress. Acquapendente, which in 1499 became part of the Papal States, lies north of the Lake Bolsena on the road that leads from Siena to Rome via Viterbo.

TREVISO

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Treviso is a noble town in the March of Treviso and very famous in the history of the Goths, since the father of King Totila, who ruled in Verona and Treviso, took particular delight in this town and lived there himself, and his son Totila, who later became king of the Ostrogoths, was born and educated there. The city of Treviso has all the necessities of life in abundance, for it is very well supplied with grain, wine, other fruits and cattle. In the city on the River Sile there are very many drinking fountains and magnificent buildings and houses."

The fortified city of Treviso is seen from the south, in its picturesque setting on the banks of the Sile River with the Alps (11) in the background. The tallest tower in the city is the Torre del Comune (6) on the Piazza dei Signori, which is surrounded by palaces with open arcades. Further left is the cathedral of San Pietro (1). Further left again is the Dominican church of San Nicolò, an example of Romanesque and Gothic brick architecture. The chapterhouse contains a fresco cycle by Tomaso da Modena that includes the earliest representation of a pair of spectacles. The tall, unlabelled tower between the cathedral and the Torre del Comune probably belongs to the church of San Francesco, part of a Franciscan monastery founded in the early 13th century. Buried in the church are two children of famous Italian poets: a son of Dante and a daughter of Petrarch. (Taschen)

Date of the first edition: 1596
Date of this map: c. 1610

Copper engraving
Size: 36.5 x 49cm (14.2 x 19.1 inches)
Verso text: French
Condition: Old coloured, upper margin frayed and stained (outside the image).
Condition Rating: A
References: Van der Krogt 4, 36; Taschen, Br. Hog., p.424.

From: Théâtre des Principales Villes de tout l'Univers. Tome 5. c. 1610.

Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.