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Utrecht by Claes Jansz. Visscher. 1624

Rare second edition by Claes Jansz. Visscher of this highly decorative map of the Province of Utrecht.

In the Zuiderzee a cartouche is located with a view of Utrecht (Traiectum). A shield with the coat of arms of the province of Utrecht is shown in the upper right. Below of it, two upright standing costumed figures (TRAIECTINI) are depicted. Along the bottom border are two rows of coat of arms. The left one shows the arms of the towns in the bishopric Utrecht (Utrecht, Amersfort, Rhenen, Wijk and Montfort), the right one the coats of arms of the most principal vasalls and allies of the bishopric Utrecht.

The map content is a reduction of the map of Utrecht by Cornelius Anthonisz. Hornhovius of 1599, now only known from a later edition by Clement de Jonghe. (Schilder)


Pieter Van den Keere (Petrus Kaerius) (1571-c.1650)

Pieter van den Keere was born in Ghent in 1571 as the son of the type-founder, Hendrik van den Keere. In 1584 he moved with his family for religious reasons to London. There, Van den Keere received training as an engraver from Jodocus Hondius, his brother-in-law. Not only the companionship with Jodocus Hondius but also the acquaintanceship with Pieter van den Berghe (Petrus Montanus) author of the text of the Germania Inferior originates from the years of refuge in London.
In 1593, both Keere and Hondius settled in Amsterdam. There, one of the first big enterprises was the large wall map of Europe, dated 1595: Nova totius Europae descriptio.
In 1610 he set up a workshop in the Kalverstraat that he called ‘In den onseeckeren tijd’ (In the uncertain time). In this period, he made numerous copperplates, including for maps for his atlas of the Netherlands and the Atlas Minor published by Jodocus Hondius.
The Germania Inferior (1617) is the first original atlas of the Netherlands published in folio size. The text for the atlas, both in Dutch and in French, was written by Petrus Montanus. After 1623, Claes Jansz. Visscher bought the plates and substituted his name for that of Kaerius’s. In 1634, Visscher included many of these maps in his Germana Inferior.
The fame of Kaerius is not only based on his atlas of the Netherlands. He is even better known as an engraver of many loose-leaf maps and as a collaborator of book publishers. His maps are found, i.a., in the Caert thresoor (Barent Langenes, 1598), Licht der Zeevaert (Blaeu, 1608), Atlas Minor (Hondius, 1628), and Caertboeck vande Midellandsche Zee (Barents, 1595).


Claes Jansz. Visscher, or N.J. Piscator (1587-1652)

Claes Jansz. Vischer bought a house in Amsterdam, 'de gulden Bors', on the important Kalverstraat and changed the name into "In de Visscher" and it was under this title that the shop was to flourish for many years.
He was famous for his engravings and etchings of Dutch landscape and of 'historical scenes', such as sieges, battles, etc. These 'historical scenes' were considered as contemporary illustrated news items, especially, e.g., that of 'the Eighty Years' War'.
For the publication of his first atlas, he bought copperplates of the atlas Germania Inferior by Pieter van den Keere (1623).
In 1649, he published an atlas entitled Tabularum Geographicarum Contractarum, containing the same maps as Langenes' Caert Thresoor, for which Visscher had only new title-pages engraved.
Claes Jansz. Visscher died in 1652. His wife, Neeltjen Florisdr., had already died in 1640. They had seven children, four of whom were still alive at Claes Jansz.'s death. One of them was Nicolaes Visscher I, who was to continue his father's business.

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Ultraiectum Dominium.

€750  ($877.5 / £637.5)
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Item Number:  28220  new
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > The Netherlands
References: Schilder 8 - p. 541 33.2

Old, antique map of Utrecht, by Claes Jansz. Visscher.

With inset view of the town of Utrecht.

Title: Ultraiectum Dominium.
CJVisscher excudebat, 1624.

Engraver: Petrus Kaerius (Pieter Van den Keere).

Date of the first edition: 1617 (by Petrus Kaerius).
Date of this map: 1624.
Date on map: 1624.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 370 x 480mm (14.57 x 18.9 inches).
Verso: Blank.
Condition: Original coloured, two additional vertical folds (reinforced), reinforcements at some small marginal tears.
Condition Rating: B
References: Schilder 8, p. 541 33.2

Separate publication.

Rare second edition by Claes Jansz. Visscher of this highly decorative map of the Province of Utrecht.

In the Zuiderzee a cartouche is located with a view of Utrecht (Traiectum). A shield with the coat of arms of the province of Utrecht is shown in the upper right. Below of it, two upright standing costumed figures (TRAIECTINI) are depicted. Along the bottom border are two rows of coat of arms. The left one shows the arms of the towns in the bishopric Utrecht (Utrecht, Amersfort, Rhenen, Wijk and Montfort), the right one the coats of arms of the most principal vasalls and allies of the bishopric Utrecht.

The map content is a reduction of the map of Utrecht by Cornelius Anthonisz. Hornhovius of 1599, now only known from a later edition by Clement de Jonghe. (Schilder)


Pieter Van den Keere (Petrus Kaerius) (1571-c.1650)

Pieter van den Keere was born in Ghent in 1571 as the son of the type-founder, Hendrik van den Keere. In 1584 he moved with his family for religious reasons to London. There, Van den Keere received training as an engraver from Jodocus Hondius, his brother-in-law. Not only the companionship with Jodocus Hondius but also the acquaintanceship with Pieter van den Berghe (Petrus Montanus) author of the text of the Germania Inferior originates from the years of refuge in London.
In 1593, both Keere and Hondius settled in Amsterdam. There, one of the first big enterprises was the large wall map of Europe, dated 1595: Nova totius Europae descriptio.
In 1610 he set up a workshop in the Kalverstraat that he called ‘In den onseeckeren tijd’ (In the uncertain time). In this period, he made numerous copperplates, including for maps for his atlas of the Netherlands and the Atlas Minor published by Jodocus Hondius.
The Germania Inferior (1617) is the first original atlas of the Netherlands published in folio size. The text for the atlas, both in Dutch and in French, was written by Petrus Montanus. After 1623, Claes Jansz. Visscher bought the plates and substituted his name for that of Kaerius’s. In 1634, Visscher included many of these maps in his Germana Inferior.
The fame of Kaerius is not only based on his atlas of the Netherlands. He is even better known as an engraver of many loose-leaf maps and as a collaborator of book publishers. His maps are found, i.a., in the Caert thresoor (Barent Langenes, 1598), Licht der Zeevaert (Blaeu, 1608), Atlas Minor (Hondius, 1628), and Caertboeck vande Midellandsche Zee (Barents, 1595).


Claes Jansz. Visscher, or N.J. Piscator (1587-1652)

Claes Jansz. Vischer bought a house in Amsterdam, 'de gulden Bors', on the important Kalverstraat and changed the name into "In de Visscher" and it was under this title that the shop was to flourish for many years.
He was famous for his engravings and etchings of Dutch landscape and of 'historical scenes', such as sieges, battles, etc. These 'historical scenes' were considered as contemporary illustrated news items, especially, e.g., that of 'the Eighty Years' War'.
For the publication of his first atlas, he bought copperplates of the atlas Germania Inferior by Pieter van den Keere (1623).
In 1649, he published an atlas entitled Tabularum Geographicarum Contractarum, containing the same maps as Langenes' Caert Thresoor, for which Visscher had only new title-pages engraved.
Claes Jansz. Visscher died in 1652. His wife, Neeltjen Florisdr., had already died in 1640. They had seven children, four of whom were still alive at Claes Jansz.'s death. One of them was Nicolaes Visscher I, who was to continue his father's business.