This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product?

Sankt Pölten, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

CAPTION: S. Polid, known in German as St Pölten, city in Lower Austria.

CARTOUCHE TOP RICHT: Procured by Georg Hoefnagel, drawn by his son Jakob in 1617.

CARTOUCHE BOTTOM LEFT: The conspiratorial and rebellious Austrian peasants met on this hill in '97 and '98. The leaders and instigators of this act of high treason were therefore martyred to death in various manners at this very place and, as a warning to others, crucified.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "This city recently became known in an inglorious manner when the rabble and the peasants rose up against the authorities here in 1597. For after many of then had complained in secret about the heavy burden of taxes and compulsory labour, and noticed that many others felt the same way, they took up their weapons. [...] Then the Count of Thurn came with some horsemen and attacked the peasants at night, giving them such a fright that they scattered in all directions."

This view from a hill shows the well-fortified city dominated by the towers of the abbey belonging to the monastery of Augustinian Canons and of the town hall. On the foreground on the left are armed peasants and in the middle two nobles, one of whome is looking at the peasants while pointing to the bodies of the executed rebels hanging on gallows on the right. The Roman town of Aelium Cetium that once existed on the site of this historic city was granted city privileges in the 2nd century AD. A Benedictine monastery dedicated to St Hippolytus was erected here in the 8th century and converted into the above-mentioned monastery of Augustinian Canons around 1050. In 1159 St Pölten received a municipal charter. The city wall was built in the 13th century and provided protection from the Turks in 1529 and in 1683. (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

back

S. Polid vulgo Sanpolten. Inferioris Austriae Civitas. - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, c.1625.

€700  ($826 / £644)
add to cart
questions?

Item Number:  16664  new
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Austria
References: Van der Krogt 4 - #4162; Fauser - #12502; Taschen, Br. Hog. - p. 459

Antique map - bird's-eye view of Sankt Pölten, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

After G. Hoefnagel and son, 1617.
Key to four locations.

Date of the first edition: 1617
Date of this map: c. 1625

Copper engraving
Size: 30 x 48cm (11.7 x 18.6 inches)
Verso text: French
Condition: Contemporary coloured, left and right margins backed..
Condition Rating: A
References: Van der Krogt 4, 4162; Taschen, Braun and Hogenberg, p.459.

From: Théatre des Principales Villes de tout l'Univers Vol. VI. c. 1625. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:3.6)

CAPTION: S. Polid, known in German as St Pölten, city in Lower Austria.

CARTOUCHE TOP RICHT: Procured by Georg Hoefnagel, drawn by his son Jakob in 1617.

CARTOUCHE BOTTOM LEFT: The conspiratorial and rebellious Austrian peasants met on this hill in '97 and '98. The leaders and instigators of this act of high treason were therefore martyred to death in various manners at this very place and, as a warning to others, crucified.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "This city recently became known in an inglorious manner when the rabble and the peasants rose up against the authorities here in 1597. For after many of then had complained in secret about the heavy burden of taxes and compulsory labour, and noticed that many others felt the same way, they took up their weapons. [...] Then the Count of Thurn came with some horsemen and attacked the peasants at night, giving them such a fright that they scattered in all directions."

This view from a hill shows the well-fortified city dominated by the towers of the abbey belonging to the monastery of Augustinian Canons and of the town hall. On the foreground on the left are armed peasants and in the middle two nobles, one of whome is looking at the peasants while pointing to the bodies of the executed rebels hanging on gallows on the right. The Roman town of Aelium Cetium that once existed on the site of this historic city was granted city privileges in the 2nd century AD. A Benedictine monastery dedicated to St Hippolytus was erected here in the 8th century and converted into the above-mentioned monastery of Augustinian Canons around 1050. In 1159 St Pölten received a municipal charter. The city wall was built in the 13th century and provided protection from the Turks in 1529 and in 1683. (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

Related items

Antique map of Eisenstadtt - Mannersdorf by Braun & Hogenberg

Eisenstadtt - Mannersdorf by Braun & Hogenberg
Eisenstadium vulgo Eisnstat, in ultimis finibus ... - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 23427]

€750  ($885 / £690)
Antique map of Innsbruck by Braun and Hogenberg

Innsbruck by Braun and Hogenberg
Oenipons, sive Enipontius vulgo Insspruck, ... - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 22402]

€650  ($767 / £598)
Innsbruck, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Innsbruck, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
Oenipons, sive Enipontius vulgo Insspruck, ... - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1575.
[Item number: 9336]

€400  ($472 / £368)
Wien, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Wien, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
Vienna Austriae Metropolis, Urbs Toto Orbe ... - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1612.
[Item number: 21881]

€550  ($649 / £506)
Wien, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Wien, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
Vienna Austriae Metropolis, Urbs Toto Orbe ... - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1572-1624.
[Item number: 22339]

€400  ($472 / £368)
Gmunden, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Gmunden, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
Gmunden. - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1596/97.
[Item number: 24185]

€420  ($495.6 / £386.4)
The Innvalley;

The Innvalley; "Schlosberg" and a view of a monument for the emperor Carolus V, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
Prospectus amoeniss. vallis Oeniponticae una cum ... - Braun Georg & Hogenberg Frans, 1596/97.
[Item number: 24191]

€320  ($377.6 / £294.4)
Enns by Braun and Hogenberg.

Enns by Braun and Hogenberg.
Ens Austriae Civitas Superiorem ab inferioris ... - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, c. 1625.
[Item number: 16363]

€480  ($566.4 / £441.6)
Linz, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Linz, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
Linsum Austriae vulgo Lintz. - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1596.
[Item number: 23391]

€750  ($885 / £690)
Zirl im Inntal, Schlossberg bei Seefeld, and Steinach am Brenner, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Zirl im Inntal, Schlossberg bei Seefeld, and Steinach am Brenner, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
Prospectus amoeniss. vallis Oeniponticae una cum ... - Georg Braun & Frans Hogenberg, 1623.
[Item number: 23397]  new

€600  ($708 / £552)