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Ancient Rome by Braun and Hogenberg. 1623

Engraving reprinted from Urbis Romae totius olim orbis domitricis situs ... P. Ligorio Inventor. 
Pirro Ligorio first published the map in Rome in 1552, then in a smaller format in 1553. His plate, made in 1570, was printed unchanged by Braun & Hogenberg; it was reprinted several times during the 17th and 18th centuries, including in David Köhler's Descriptio orbis antiqui, published in Nuremberg by Christoph Weigel c. 1720.

TRANSLATION OF CAPTION: Layout of the city of Rome with the remains of the old monuments as they can still be seen today, drawn by Pyrrhus Ligorius of Naples. Rome 1570.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The city of Rome, famed all over the world, is also the queen, the head and the embellishment of the whole world, situated on the River Tiber, built by Romulus in the 11th year of the rule of Ezekiel, the king of Judah, and given the name Rome by him. According to Pliny, this city had 30 open and seven closed gates. Rome also has seven hills; the Capitol is the main hill on which the famous temple of the great heathen god Jupiter was found, surpassing all the marvellous works of the Egyptians. The Field of Mars is adorned with wonderful buildings between the city and the Tiber."


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, also known as the 'Braun & Hogenberg', is a six-volume town atlas and the most excellent book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun, a skilled writer, wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. Many plates were engraved after the original drawings of a professional artist, Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600). The first volume was published in Latin in 1572 and the sixth in 1617. Frans Hogenberg, a talented engraver, created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel made those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographers Daniel Freese and Heinrich Rantzau, who provided valuable geographical information. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used as references. Translations appeared in German and French, making the atlas accessible to a wider audience.

Since its original publication of volume 1 in 1572, the Civitates Orbis Terrarum has left an indelible mark on the history of cartography. The first volume was followed by seven more editions in 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1612. Vol.2, initially released in 1575, saw subsequent editions in 1597 and 1612. The subsequent volumes, each a treasure trove of historical insights, graced the world in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1606. The German translation of the first volume, a testament to its widespread appeal, debuted in 1574, followed by the French edition in 1575.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz, and Peter von Brachel, all of whom worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun, the author of the text accompanying the plans and views in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne, he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice, indicating his commitment to learning and intellectual pursuits. In 1561, he obtained his bachelor's degree; in 1562, he received his Magister Artium, further demonstrating his academic achievements. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he continued his studies in theology, gaining a licentiate in theology. His theological background likely influenced the content and tone of the text in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, adding a unique perspective to the work.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s, Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named an engraver of numerous maps. In 1568, he was banned from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. He immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates, published in 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to large-scale projects like the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

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Urbis Romae Situs cum ils quae adhuc Conspiciuntur Veter. Monumet Reliquiis Pyrrho Ligorio Neap. Invent. Romae M.D.LXX

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Item Number:  22409 Authenticity Guarantee

Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Italy - Cities

Old, antique bird’s-eye view plan of Ancient Rome by Braun and Hogenberg.

Title: Urbis Romae Situs cum ils quae adhuc Conspiciuntur Veter. Monumet Reliquiis Pyrrho Ligorio Neap. Invent. Romae M.D.LXX

Date of the first edition: 1575.
Date of this map: 1623.

Copper engraving, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 380 x 505mm (14.96 x 19.88 inches).
Verso: Latin text.
Condition: Uncoloured, rust spot in the upper centre of the image.
Condition Rating: A.

From: Civitates Orbis Terrarum, ... Part 2: De Praecipuis, Totius Universi Urbibus, Liber Secundus. Köln, Petrus von Brachel, 1623. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:1.2)

Engraving reprinted from Urbis Romae totius olim orbis domitricis situs ... P. Ligorio Inventor. 
Pirro Ligorio first published the map in Rome in 1552, then in a smaller format in 1553. His plate, made in 1570, was printed unchanged by Braun & Hogenberg; it was reprinted several times during the 17th and 18th centuries, including in David Köhler's Descriptio orbis antiqui, published in Nuremberg by Christoph Weigel c. 1720.

TRANSLATION OF CAPTION: Layout of the city of Rome with the remains of the old monuments as they can still be seen today, drawn by Pyrrhus Ligorius of Naples. Rome 1570.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "The city of Rome, famed all over the world, is also the queen, the head and the embellishment of the whole world, situated on the River Tiber, built by Romulus in the 11th year of the rule of Ezekiel, the king of Judah, and given the name Rome by him. According to Pliny, this city had 30 open and seven closed gates. Rome also has seven hills; the Capitol is the main hill on which the famous temple of the great heathen god Jupiter was found, surpassing all the marvellous works of the Egyptians. The Field of Mars is adorned with wonderful buildings between the city and the Tiber."


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, also known as the 'Braun & Hogenberg', is a six-volume town atlas and the most excellent book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun, a skilled writer, wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. Many plates were engraved after the original drawings of a professional artist, Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600). The first volume was published in Latin in 1572 and the sixth in 1617. Frans Hogenberg, a talented engraver, created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel made those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographers Daniel Freese and Heinrich Rantzau, who provided valuable geographical information. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used as references. Translations appeared in German and French, making the atlas accessible to a wider audience.

Since its original publication of volume 1 in 1572, the Civitates Orbis Terrarum has left an indelible mark on the history of cartography. The first volume was followed by seven more editions in 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1612. Vol.2, initially released in 1575, saw subsequent editions in 1597 and 1612. The subsequent volumes, each a treasure trove of historical insights, graced the world in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599, and 1606. The German translation of the first volume, a testament to its widespread appeal, debuted in 1574, followed by the French edition in 1575.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz, and Peter von Brachel, all of whom worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun, the author of the text accompanying the plans and views in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne, he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice, indicating his commitment to learning and intellectual pursuits. In 1561, he obtained his bachelor's degree; in 1562, he received his Magister Artium, further demonstrating his academic achievements. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he continued his studies in theology, gaining a licentiate in theology. His theological background likely influenced the content and tone of the text in the Civitates Orbis Terrarum, adding a unique perspective to the work.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s, Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named an engraver of numerous maps. In 1568, he was banned from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. He immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates, published in 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to large-scale projects like the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

References: Van der Krogt 4 - 3632; Fauser - 11908; Taschen (Br. Hog.) - p.169

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