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Middelburg by Braun & Hogenberg

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Middelburgum, Selandiae Opp: Situ, Opere, et Mercimoniis, Florentiss: - Braun & Hogenberg.

€480  ($561.6 / £432)
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Item Number:  4669
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > Netherlands - Cities

Antique map - bird's-eye view plan of Middelburg by Braun & Hogenberg.

TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Middelburg in Zeeland, a town highly reputed for its favourable location and industrious trade.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "From Middelburg there are two channels that are navigable as far as Arnemuiden; one goes in a straight line and is so deep and so wide that ships can easily pass through it, even when they are loaded with 200 barrels of wine. Middelburg is the most important trade centre for wines that are brought to the Netherlands over the sea from France, Spain, Portugal or other places."

This bird's-eye view from the southeast shows the capital of Zeeland province, on the Island of Walcheren. The favourable geographical location and an import monopoly on spices, silk cloth and French wines led to Middelburg being granted a town charter as early as 1217, and in the 16th century it was a prosperous trading city with a population of 30,000. The influential Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) had 336 ships built here between 1602 and 1795. The splendid town hall (Stathuys), built in the late Gothic style under Charles the Bold, can be identified on the market square. In front of it stands the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe abbey with the Choir Church (Koorkerk) dating from around 1300 with its 85-m-high tower, "De Lange Jan". (Taschen)

Date of the first edition: 1575
Date of this map: 1575

Copper engraving
Size: 32 x 36cm (12.4 x 13.9 inches)
Verso text: Latin
Condition: Old coloured, excellent.
Condition Rating: A
References: Taschen, Braun and Hogenberg, p.161.

From: Civitates Orbis Terrarum, ... Part 2: De Praecipuis, Totius Universi Urbibus, Liber Secundus. Köln, Gottfried von Kempen, 1575. (Van der Krogt 4, 41:1.2)