This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product? (#22257)

Rotterdam, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg. 1588-97

TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Rotterdam, at the mouth of the River Roter, home town of the great Desiderius Erasmus.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Rotterdam is a city in northern Holland that is known far and wide because of the glorious Erasmus of Rotterdam. In the Dutch language it is called Rotterdam, like many other cities in this country with names ending in -dam, such as Amsterdam, Sparendam, Munichendam, Edam, Schedam etc., because they were all built on a dam. Its citizens are wealthy, have a renowned herring fishing industry and conduct trade with foreign countries. For many years they have been inclined towards religious reform and today still adhere to the teaching of Calvin."

This is a bird's-eye view from the west of the city, which is surrounded by a wall erected in 1359. The view is dominated by canals, the mouth of the new Meuse and the tributaries of the Meuse, including the River Rotte, from which the city gets the name. The late Gothic Sint Laurenskerk stands out clearly, and the ocean-going ships are a reference to the city's role as a trading port. After growing up as a fishing village in the early 13th century, Rotterdam was granted a municipal charter in 1340. Canals to the Schie linked the city with Delft, the most important trade centre at that time, from whose wealth it was able to profit. From 1586 onwards high numbers of refugees from the Spanish Netherlands settled in the city. The most important commercial activities were tapestry and cloth production; at that time the port ranked far behind Amsterdam. (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

back

Roterodamum

€750  ($780 / £652.5)
add to cart
questions?
PRINT

Item Number:  22257
Category:  Antique maps > Europe > The Netherlands - Cities
References: Taschen (Br. Hog.) - p.285

Bird's-eye view plan of Rotterdam by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg, after Jacob van Deventer.

Copper engraving
Size: 28.5 x 40cm (11.1 x 15.6 inches)
Verso text: Latin
Condition: Old coloured.
Condition Rating: A
References: Taschen, Braun and Hogenberg, p.285.

From: Liber quartus Urbium Praecipuarum totius Mundi. (Koeman, B&H4)

TRANSLATION OF CARTOUCHE TEXT: Rotterdam, at the mouth of the River Roter, home town of the great Desiderius Erasmus.

COMMENTARY BY BRAUN: "Rotterdam is a city in northern Holland that is known far and wide because of the glorious Erasmus of Rotterdam. In the Dutch language it is called Rotterdam, like many other cities in this country with names ending in -dam, such as Amsterdam, Sparendam, Munichendam, Edam, Schedam etc., because they were all built on a dam. Its citizens are wealthy, have a renowned herring fishing industry and conduct trade with foreign countries. For many years they have been inclined towards religious reform and today still adhere to the teaching of Calvin."

This is a bird's-eye view from the west of the city, which is surrounded by a wall erected in 1359. The view is dominated by canals, the mouth of the new Meuse and the tributaries of the Meuse, including the River Rotte, from which the city gets the name. The late Gothic Sint Laurenskerk stands out clearly, and the ocean-going ships are a reference to the city's role as a trading port. After growing up as a fishing village in the early 13th century, Rotterdam was granted a municipal charter in 1340. Canals to the Schie linked the city with Delft, the most important trade centre at that time, from whose wealth it was able to profit. From 1586 onwards high numbers of refugees from the Spanish Netherlands settled in the city. The most important commercial activities were tapestry and cloth production; at that time the port ranked far behind Amsterdam. (Taschen)


Braun G. & Hogenberg F. and the Civitates Orbis Terrarum.

The Civitates Orbis Terrarum, or the "Braun & Hogenberg", is a six-volume town atlas and the greatest book of town views and plans ever published: 363 engravings, sometimes beautifully coloured. It was one of the best-selling works in the last quarter of the 16th century. Georg Braun wrote the text accompanying the plans and views on the verso. A large number of the plates were engraved after the original drawings of Joris Hoefnagel (1542-1600), who was a professional artist. The first volume was published in Latin in 1572, the sixth volume in 1617. Frans Hogenberg created the tables for volumes I through IV, and Simon van den Neuwel created those for volumes V and VI. Other contributors were cartographer Daniel Freese, and Heinrich Rantzau. Works by Jacob van Deventer, Sebastian Münster, and Johannes Stumpf were also used. Translations appeared in German and French.

Following the original publication of Volume 1 of the Civitates in 1572, seven further editions of 1575, 1577, 1582, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1612 can be identified. Vol.2, first issued in 1575, was followed by further editions in 1597 and in 1612. The next volumes appeared in 1581, 1588, 1593, 1599 and 1606. The German translation of the first volume appeared from 1574 on and the French edition from 1575 on.

Several printers were involved: Theodor Graminaeus, Heinrich von Aich, Gottfried von Kempen, Johannis Sinniger, Bertram Buchholtz and Peter von Brachel, who all worked in Cologne.

Georg Braun (1541-1622)

Georg Braun was born in Cologne in 1541. After his studies in Cologne he entered the Jesuit Order as a novice. In 1561 he obtained his bachelor's degree and in 1562 his Magister Artium. Although he left the Jesuit Order, he studied theology, gaining a licentiate in theology.

Frans Hogenberg (1535-1590)

Frans Hogenberg was a Flemish and German painter, engraver, and mapmaker. He was born in Mechelen as the son of Nicolaas Hogenberg.

By the end of the 1560s Frans Hogenberg was employed upon Abraham Ortelius's Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, published in 1570; he is named as engraver of numerous maps. In 1568 he was bannend from Antwerp by the Duke of Alva and travelled to London, where he stayed a few years before emigrating to Cologne. There he immediately embarked on his two most important works, the Civitates published from 1572 and the Geschichtsblätter, which appeared in several series from 1569 until about 1587.

Thanks to such large scale projects as the Geschichtsblätter and the Civitates, Hogenberg's social circumstances improved with each passing year. He died as a wealthy man in Cologne in 1590.

Related items

Dordrecht by Braun and Hogenberg

Dordrecht 1616
Dordrecht by Braun and Hogenberg
[Item number: 4158]

€360  ($374.4 / £313.2)
Leeuwarden & Franeker by Braun & Hogenberg.

Lewardum. Occidentalis Frisiae Opp: 1580. [on sheet with:] Franicher, Nobiliu hominum, in Frisia Occidentali, ut plurimum saedes. 1581-88
Leeuwarden & Franeker by Braun & Hogenberg.
[Item number: 20439]

€300  ($312 / £261)
Antique map of Sneek, Doccum, Sloten, IJlst by Braun & Hogenberg

Sneecha, vulgo Sneeck ... [on sheet with] Doccum [and] Sloten [and] Ylsta. 1599
Antique map of Sneek, Doccum, Sloten, IJlst by Braun & Hogenberg
[Item number: 22263]

€360  ($374.4 / £313.2)
Arnhem, Venlo, Gelre and Roermond, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Arnhemium (on sheet with) Venlonum (and) Gelria (and) Ruremunda 1581-88
Arnhem, Venlo, Gelre and Roermond, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 21605]

€250  ($260 / £217.5)
Brielle (Den Briel), by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Brilium, Holandiae opp. ob Intestinum Batavicum Bellum, ... 1575
Brielle (Den Briel), by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 8099]

€250  ($260 / £217.5)
Maastricht, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Maestricht - Traiectum ad Mosam. 1581
Maastricht, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 21546]

€420  ($436.8 / £365.4)
Bergen-op-Zoom, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Bergen op Zoom - Berga, ad Somam, Brabantiae Opp: a fluvi olo sic dicto, ... 1581-88
Bergen-op-Zoom, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 23306]

€450  ($468 / £391.5)
Zwolle, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Swolla diu celebris meruit virtutibus Arma: ... 1599
Zwolle, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 23318]

€480  ($499.2 / £417.6)
Kampen, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Urbis Campensis ad Isalam Fluvium Icon 1581-88
Kampen, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 22215]

€300  ($312 / £261)
Old antique map - bird's-eye view plan of Haarlem by Braun and Hogenberg

Harlemum, Sive ut Ha: Barlan Herlemum, Urbs Hollandiae famosa, ... 1597
Old antique map - bird's-eye view plan of Haarlem by Braun and Hogenberg
[Item number: 23980]

€380  ($395.2 / £330.6)
Nijmegen, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Noviomagium. 1599
Nijmegen, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 24033]

€560  ($582.4 / £487.2)
Kampen by Braun and Hogenberg.

Urbis Campensis ad Isalam Fluvium Icon. 1599
Kampen by Braun and Hogenberg.
[Item number: 24049]

€200  ($208 / £174)
Zutphen by Braun and Hogenberg, after Jacob van Deventer.

Zutphen 1599
Zutphen by Braun and Hogenberg, after Jacob van Deventer.
[Item number: 24090]

€300  ($312 / £261)
Sneek, Doccum, Sloten, IJlst, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.

Sneecha, vulgo Sneeck ... [on sheet with] Doccum [and] Sloten [and] Ylsta. 1599
Sneek, Doccum, Sloten, IJlst, by Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg.
[Item number: 24092]

€300  ($312 / £261)
Amersfoort by Braun Georg & Hogenberg Frans

Amorfortia Diocesis Ultraiectensis Oppidum amoenitate loci solique fertilitate admodum insigne. c. 1593
Amersfoort by Braun Georg & Hogenberg Frans
[Item number: 15424]

€580  ($603.2 / £504.6)
Old antique plan of Rotterdam - Gouda by Braun & Hogenberg

Roterodamum Hollandiae Opp. [on sheet whith:] Goude 1582
Old antique plan of Rotterdam - Gouda by Braun & Hogenberg
[Item number: 14186]

€600  ($624 / £522)
Old antique plan of Nijmegen by Braun & Hogenberg

Nymmegen - Noviomagium sive Nouiomagum vulgo Nijmmegen inclyta quoda Francorum Regia Urbs Gelriae primaria. 1582
Old antique plan of Nijmegen by Braun & Hogenberg
[Item number: 14229]

€500  ($520 / £435)
Rotterdam, by M. Merian.

Rotterdam. 1638
Rotterdam, by M. Merian.
[Item number: 25876]

€420  ($436.8 / £365.4)
Rotterdam, by Joan Blaeu.

Rotterdam. 1652
Rotterdam, by Joan Blaeu.
[Item number: 16970]

€2300  ($2392 / £2001)
Amsterdam by Sebastian Münster.

La Ville de Roterdam. [sic] 1552
Amsterdam by Sebastian Münster.
[Item number: 28225]

€270  ($280.8 / £234.9)