This product is successfully added to your cart
Questions about this product? (#26772)

Authenticity Guarantee
All items are guaranteed authentic prints (woodcuts or engravings) or manuscripts made at or about (c.) the given date and in good condition unless stated otherwise. We don’t sell facsimiles or reproductions. We deliver every map with a Certificate of Authenticity containing all the details.

Southeast Asia by Claudius Ptolemeus - Lorenz Fries 1541

Lorenz Fries* (c. 1485 – 1532)

Lorenz Fries, a physician, astrologer, and cartographic editor, was a native Alsatian. Nothing is known about his youth and early schooling. His university education in philosophy and medicine seems to have been acquired at several schools. He probably attended Vienna, Montpellier, Piacenza, and Pavia. He obtained the degree of doctor of arts at one of these institutions.

His first professional position was in Sélestat, near Strasbourg. He practised medicine in Colmar from 1514 to 1518. He wrote several medical works, among them a practice entitled Spiegel der Artzny (Mirror of Medicine), a trendy book with seven editions up to 1546. After 1519 he moved to Strasbourg, where he stayed until about 1527.

In 1520, Fries became involved in the publication of new editions of maps by Martin Waldseemüller. He collaborated with Peter Apian to publish a much-reduced version of Waldseemüller's map of 1507.

In the meantime, Fries was preparing a new edition of Ptolemy's Geographia. The book was printed in 1522 by Johannes Grüninger, an esteemed printer from Strasbourg who had previously published the Waldseemüller. It was based on Waldseemüller's editions of 1513 and 1520. Fries says in a note to the reader: "…, we declare that these maps were originally constructed by Martin Waldseemüller, piously deceased and that they have been drawn in a format smaller than that which they ever had before". The book sold well, and new editions would follow, printed with the same woodblocks.

In 1525, Willibald Pirkheimer, the Nuremberg humanist, published a new edition with Grüninger. The volume was published jointly with the Nuremberg printer Johannes Koberger. It included the same fifty Waldseemüller/Fries maps as the 1522 edition.

Michael Servetus (= Michael Villanovus) printed two more editions in Lyon in 1535 and 1541. Servetus was tried for heresy in 1553. One of the allegations was that he had written a statement on the verso of the map of the Holy Land describing it as primarily infertile. The idea originated in Fries's edition in 1522. Servetus was burned at the stake, and at Calvin's orders, many copies of Servetus's books followed him into the flames.

Fries also published other books on astrology and medicine. In addition, he undertook a reduction of Waldseemüller's large map of 1516, the Carta marina navigatoria, which he translated into German simultaneously. The map was published in 1525, but no copy survived of this edition. The earliest copy known is dated 1530.

In 1525 Strasbourg had become a thoroughly reformed city, and the Roman church's adherents found themselves increasingly unwelcome. It was probably for this reason that Fries renounced his citizenship and moved to Metz. During this period, he published his last two medical works.

*He should not be confused with the historian Lorenz Fries of Mergentheim (1491-1550).


Martin Waldseemüller (Ilacomilus) (c. 1473-1519)

Martin Walseemüller and his collaborator, Matthias Ringmann, are credited with the first recorded usage of the word America to name the New World in honour of the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci.

He was born about 1475, most probably in the village of Wolfenweiler near Freiburg im Breisgau (southern Germany). He studied at the University of Freiburg, where he met Johann Scott, the future printer of Waldseemüller’s edition of Ptolemy and Matthias Ringman, a poet who wrote Waldseemüller’s texts. Gregor Reisch was their tutor. He was noted for a philosophical work, Margaretha Philosophica (1503), a widely read book which included a world map in Ptolemaic form. He undoubtedly aroused the students’ interest in cosmography.

At the beginning of the 16th century, Walseemüller moved to St.Dié in the Vosges. He Hellenized his name to Ilacomilus and worked on an edition of Ptolemy. He learned the printing trade in Basle and became a professor of cosmography under the patronage of René II, Duke of Lorraine.

Together with a group of scholars, among them were Nicholas Lud and Matthias Ringmann, they installed a printing press in St. Dié. The first book appeared in 1507: Cosmographiae introductio … Few books have generated as much interest and speculation as this book because it contained the suggestion that the new continent is named America in honour of Amerigo Vespucci, whose letters about his American “discoveries” form a large part of the book. Great interest was also attached to the two maps mentioned on the title page constituting part of the Cosmographiae introductio: a large 12-panel wall map of the world and a set of globe gores. The map and globe were notable for showing the New World as a continent separate from Asia and for naming the southern landmass America.

Ringmann wrote the text of the Cosmographiae introductio in which he used the name ‘America’. He died in 1511, and by then, Waldseemüller was having doubts about the name they had coined.

In 1511 Walseemüller published the Carta Itineraria Europae, a road map of Europe that showed essential trade routes and pilgrim routes from central Europe to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. It was the first printed wall map of Europe.
After Ringmann’s death, Waldseemüller concentrated on the new version of Ptolemy’s Geographia. The new edition was finally printed in 1513 by Johannes Scott in Strasbourg and is now regarded as the most important. Waldseemüller included twenty modern maps in the new Geographia as a separate appendix.

The 1507 wall map was lost for a long time, but Joseph Fischer found a copy in Schloss Wolfegg in southern Germany in 1901. It is the only known copy purchased by the United States Library of Congress in May 2003.

back

Tabula Undecima Asiae continet Indiam extra Gangem, & Synarum regionem.

SOLD

Item Number:  26772 Authenticity Guarantee

Category:  Antique maps > Asia > India - Ceylon
References: Karrow - 28/26

Ptolemaic map of Southeast Asia, by Lorenz Fries, after Martin Waldseemüller.

Date of the first edition: 1522
Date of this map: 1541

Woodcut, printed on paper.
Size (not including margins): 28 x 31.5cm (11 x 12.2 inches)
Verso text: Latin
Condition: Mint
Condition Rating: A+
References: Karrow, 28/26.

From: Claudii Ptolemaei Alexandrini geographicae enarrationis libri octo. Lyon, M. Servetus, 1541. (Karrow, 288/G.3)

The editor of this edition, Michael Villanovus (better known as Servetus), was tried for heresy in 1553. He was burned at the stake, and at Calvin's orders, many copies of Servetus's books, including this one, followed him into the flames.

Lorenz Fries* (c. 1485 – 1532)

Lorenz Fries, a physician, astrologer, and cartographic editor, was a native Alsatian. Nothing is known about his youth and early schooling. His university education in philosophy and medicine seems to have been acquired at several schools. He probably attended Vienna, Montpellier, Piacenza, and Pavia. He obtained the degree of doctor of arts at one of these institutions.

His first professional position was in Sélestat, near Strasbourg. He practised medicine in Colmar from 1514 to 1518. He wrote several medical works, among them a practice entitled Spiegel der Artzny (Mirror of Medicine), a trendy book with seven editions up to 1546. After 1519 he moved to Strasbourg, where he stayed until about 1527.

In 1520, Fries became involved in the publication of new editions of maps by Martin Waldseemüller. He collaborated with Peter Apian to publish a much-reduced version of Waldseemüller's map of 1507.

In the meantime, Fries was preparing a new edition of Ptolemy's Geographia. The book was printed in 1522 by Johannes Grüninger, an esteemed printer from Strasbourg who had previously published the Waldseemüller. It was based on Waldseemüller's editions of 1513 and 1520. Fries says in a note to the reader: "…, we declare that these maps were originally constructed by Martin Waldseemüller, piously deceased and that they have been drawn in a format smaller than that which they ever had before". The book sold well, and new editions would follow, printed with the same woodblocks.

In 1525, Willibald Pirkheimer, the Nuremberg humanist, published a new edition with Grüninger. The volume was published jointly with the Nuremberg printer Johannes Koberger. It included the same fifty Waldseemüller/Fries maps as the 1522 edition.

Michael Servetus (= Michael Villanovus) printed two more editions in Lyon in 1535 and 1541. Servetus was tried for heresy in 1553. One of the allegations was that he had written a statement on the verso of the map of the Holy Land describing it as primarily infertile. The idea originated in Fries's edition in 1522. Servetus was burned at the stake, and at Calvin's orders, many copies of Servetus's books followed him into the flames.

Fries also published other books on astrology and medicine. In addition, he undertook a reduction of Waldseemüller's large map of 1516, the Carta marina navigatoria, which he translated into German simultaneously. The map was published in 1525, but no copy survived of this edition. The earliest copy known is dated 1530.

In 1525 Strasbourg had become a thoroughly reformed city, and the Roman church's adherents found themselves increasingly unwelcome. It was probably for this reason that Fries renounced his citizenship and moved to Metz. During this period, he published his last two medical works.

*He should not be confused with the historian Lorenz Fries of Mergentheim (1491-1550).


Martin Waldseemüller (Ilacomilus) (c. 1473-1519)

Martin Walseemüller and his collaborator, Matthias Ringmann, are credited with the first recorded usage of the word America to name the New World in honour of the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci.

He was born about 1475, most probably in the village of Wolfenweiler near Freiburg im Breisgau (southern Germany). He studied at the University of Freiburg, where he met Johann Scott, the future printer of Waldseemüller’s edition of Ptolemy and Matthias Ringman, a poet who wrote Waldseemüller’s texts. Gregor Reisch was their tutor. He was noted for a philosophical work, Margaretha Philosophica (1503), a widely read book which included a world map in Ptolemaic form. He undoubtedly aroused the students’ interest in cosmography.

At the beginning of the 16th century, Walseemüller moved to St.Dié in the Vosges. He Hellenized his name to Ilacomilus and worked on an edition of Ptolemy. He learned the printing trade in Basle and became a professor of cosmography under the patronage of René II, Duke of Lorraine.

Together with a group of scholars, among them were Nicholas Lud and Matthias Ringmann, they installed a printing press in St. Dié. The first book appeared in 1507: Cosmographiae introductio … Few books have generated as much interest and speculation as this book because it contained the suggestion that the new continent is named America in honour of Amerigo Vespucci, whose letters about his American “discoveries” form a large part of the book. Great interest was also attached to the two maps mentioned on the title page constituting part of the Cosmographiae introductio: a large 12-panel wall map of the world and a set of globe gores. The map and globe were notable for showing the New World as a continent separate from Asia and for naming the southern landmass America.

Ringmann wrote the text of the Cosmographiae introductio in which he used the name ‘America’. He died in 1511, and by then, Waldseemüller was having doubts about the name they had coined.

In 1511 Walseemüller published the Carta Itineraria Europae, a road map of Europe that showed essential trade routes and pilgrim routes from central Europe to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. It was the first printed wall map of Europe.
After Ringmann’s death, Waldseemüller concentrated on the new version of Ptolemy’s Geographia. The new edition was finally printed in 1513 by Johannes Scott in Strasbourg and is now regarded as the most important. Waldseemüller included twenty modern maps in the new Geographia as a separate appendix.

The 1507 wall map was lost for a long time, but Joseph Fischer found a copy in Schloss Wolfegg in southern Germany in 1901. It is the only known copy purchased by the United States Library of Congress in May 2003.

Related items

Southeast Asia, par Robert de Vaugondy.

Archipel des Indes Orientales qui Comprend les Isles de la Sonde, Moluques et Philippines. c. 1757
Southeast Asia, par Robert de Vaugondy.
[Item number: 4751]

€500  ($550 / £435)
Southeast Asia, by J. Janssonius.

Indiae Orientalis Nova Descriptio. 1644-58
Southeast Asia, by J. Janssonius.
[Item number: 10013]

€1100  ($1210 / £957)
Southeast Asia, by G. Mercator - J. Hondius.

Insulae Indiae Orientalis. 1630
Southeast Asia, by G. Mercator - J. Hondius.
[Item number: 25234]

€480  ($528 / £417.6)
Southeast Asia, by J. Ottens.

Le Royaume de Siam avec les Royaumes qui luy sont Tributaires, et les Isles de Sumatra, Andemaon, etc. et les Isles Voisine. c. 1700
Southeast Asia, by J. Ottens.
[Item number: 25716]

€1600  ($1760 / £1392)
Southeast Asia by Nicolaes Visscher, published by Petrus Schenk.

Indiae Orientalis nec non Insularum Adiacentium Nova Descriptio. c. 1740
Southeast Asia by Nicolaes Visscher, published by Petrus Schenk.
[Item number: 25718]

€1200  ($1320 / £1044)
Indonesia - New Guinea - Australia by J.B. Elwe.

Partie de la Nouvelle Grande Carte des Indes Orientales, Contenant les Isles de Borneo, Iava, Celebes, Mindanao ... 1792
Indonesia - New Guinea - Australia by J.B. Elwe.
[Item number: 2293]

€600  ($660 / £522)
Southeast Asia, by Pieter van der Aa.

L'Inde de la le Gange, 1713
Southeast Asia, by Pieter van der Aa.
[Item number: 26097]

€650  ($715 / £565.5)
Southeast AsiabyBarent Langenes & Cornelis Claesz

India Orien. 1598
Southeast AsiabyBarent Langenes & Cornelis Claesz
[Item number: 20644]

€400  ($440 / £348)
Southeast Asia, by Giovanni Magini.

India Orientalis. 1597
Southeast Asia, by Giovanni Magini.
[Item number: 26521]

€380  ($418 / £330.6)
Southeast Asia by Willem & Joan Blaeu

India quae Orientalis dicitur et Insulae Adiacentes. 1640-43
Southeast Asia by Willem & Joan Blaeu
[Item number: 26566]

€2200  ($2420 / £1914)
Philippines - Indonesia by Tirion I.

Nieuwe Kaart van de Filippynsche, Ladrones, Moluccos of Specery Eilanden als mede Celebes, etc. 1744
Philippines - Indonesia by Tirion I.
[Item number: 26584]

€350  ($385 / £304.5)
East Indian Archipelago, by Jodocus Hondius.

Insulae Indiae Orientalis Praecipuae, in quibus Moluccae celeberrimae sunt. 1623
East Indian Archipelago, by Jodocus Hondius.
[Item number: 27820]

€3800  ($4180 / £3306)
Southeast Asia, by Emanuel Bowen.

A New and Accurate Map of the East India Islands. 1747
Southeast Asia, by Emanuel Bowen.
[Item number: 28012]

€380  ($418 / £330.6)
Southeast Asia, by Abraham Ortelius.

Indiae Orientalis Insularumque Adiacientium Typus. 1572
Southeast Asia, by Abraham Ortelius.
[Item number: 28046]

€2700  ($2970 / £2349)
Southeast Asia by Jacques Nicolas Bellin.

Suite de L'Ocean Oriental Contenant Les Isles de la Sonde Les Costes de Tunquin et de la Chine Les Isles du Japon les Philippines Moluques. 1747
Southeast Asia by Jacques Nicolas Bellin.
[Item number: 28189]

€250  ($275 / £217.5)
Southeast Asia by Rigobert Bonne.

Carte des Indes en deçà et au dela du Gange; avec les Isles de la Sonde, Borneo, les Moluques et les Philippines. Partie Orientale. 1690
Southeast Asia by Rigobert Bonne.
[Item number: 28304]

€260  ($286 / £226.2)
Southeast Asia by Giacomo Gastaldi / Ptolemy.

Tabula Asiae XI. 1548
Southeast Asia by Giacomo Gastaldi / Ptolemy.
[Item number: 28362]

€620  ($682 / £539.4)
Indochina by Cantelli da Vignola, published by Giovanni Giacomo de Rossi.

Penisola Dell India di la dal Gange Divisa ne i Regni, che in essasi contengono et accresciuta di varie notizie. 1692
Indochina by Cantelli da Vignola, published by Giovanni Giacomo de Rossi.
[Item number: 28371]

€1900  ($2090 / £1653)
Southeast Asia by Nicolaes Visscher I.

Indiae Orientalis nec non Insularum Adiacentium Nova Descriptio. c. 1578
Southeast Asia by Nicolaes Visscher I.
[Item number: 28555]

€1650  ($1815 / £1435.5)